Meet the Authors

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We are a group of over 120 contributors from around the world, all passionate about human habitat, urban nature and its importance for people for good urban design.

Urban social-ecology and design is fundamentally multidisciplinary, and we are a diverse group, including ecologists, sociologists, architects, designers, leaders of NGO’s, city managers, professors, activists, and nature writers. Explore the map and bios below to see who we are and where we live.


Click on the markers to explore or view The Nature of Cities in a larger map

David Maddox

David Maddox

Founder & Editor-in-Chief, The Nature of Cities
Principal, Urban Oikos Partners LLC
New York, NY USA

David Maddox is committed to the health of the urban ecosystem—urban resilience, the application of ecosystem services for human welfare and livelihoods, and the effective and efficient monitoring and evaluation of these issues. As Founder and Editor of TheNatureOfCities.com and Principal of Urban Oikos Partners LLC, his current work is in the development and dissemination of useful knowledge for design and management of social-ecological systems in urban landscapes. He hold a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, with a statistics minor, from Cornell University and lives in New York City. Other interests can be seen at http://www.williebellmusic.com.

Jennifer Adams

Jennifer Adams

Jennifer D. Adams is an associate professor of science education at Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research focuses on STEM teaching and learning in informal science contexts including museums, National Parks and everyday settings. She has worked as an educator and researcher in NYC public schools and the American Museum of Natural History. Her research portfolio includes youth learning and identity in informal science contexts, with a focus on underrepresented youth and place/identity in environmental education. She uses a combined sociocultural and geographical lens to study the relationships between people, places and learning.


Marina Alberti

Marina Alberti

Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning
University of Washington
Seattle, WA USA

Marina Alberti is professor of Urban and Environmental Planning in the Department of Urban Design and Planning in the University of Washington’s College of Built Environments. She directs the Urban Ecology Research Laboratory http://www.urbaneco.washington.edu/ and the UW Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program in Urban Design and Planning http://depts.washington.edu/urbdpphd/. Her research focuses on Coupled Natural and Human Systems and Urban Resilience. She has led as a Principal Investigator a number large interdisciplinary research projects, the most recent studying the emergent properties of coupled human nature systems in two metro regions: Seattle, WA and Phoenix, AZ. Alberti’s work is grounded in complex system theory, system modeling and scenario planning. Dr. Alberti has authored or co-authored seven books and more than 50 peer-reviewed publications. Her most recent book Advances in Urban Ecology (Springer 2008) synthesizes the state of knowledge on the complex interactions between of urbanization and ecological function and articulates the challenges and opportunities for scholars of urban ecosystems.


Will Allen

Will Allen

Will is the Director of Strategic Conservation Planning at The Conservation Fund in Chapel Hill, NC. With the Fund for 20 years, Will manages the Fund’s design and delivery of customized planning services including green infrastructure plans, strategic mitigation solutions, ecosystem service and optimization models, data-driven decision support maps and tools, and tactical conservation guidance. Will and his team support a wide range of initiatives including Multi-species habitat conservation plans, metropolitan greenspace networks, and re-use of urban vacant and underutilized lands. Will and his team have received planning and mapping awards from the American Planning Association, American Society of Landscape Architects, and Esri, Inc.

Will also develops curriculum and serves as an instructor for green infrastructure seminars and courses, publishes peer reviewed journal and trade publication articles, and serves as co-editor-in-chief and managing editor of the Journal of Conservation Planning. Will is a member of the American Planning Association and co-founder of the Society for Conservation GIS. Will holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in urban studies from Stanford University and a Masters in Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill.


Pippin Anderson

Pippin Anderson

Department of Environmental and Geographical Science and
The African Centre for Cities
University of Cape Town, South Africa

Pippin Anderson works at the University of Cape Town in South Africa where she is lecturer and director of graduate studies in the Department of Environmental and Geographical Science and urban ecology researcher at the African Centre for Cities. With a Masters degree in Conservation Biology and a PhD in Plant Ecology, Pippin has always had an interest in peopled-landscapes. In the last few years she has turned her interests to urban ecosystems and this informs her current teaching and research. Pippin lives in a dense suburb close to the city centre in Cape Town, yet from her roof (she goes up there for purposes of sanity) she can see Table Mountain National Park. She loves this dichotomy where city and nature must coexist, with their different temporal and spatial scales, and each so variably imagined by the population of the City. She enjoys grappling with the messiness of the ecology of human dominated landscapes.


Marielle Anzelone

Marielle Anzelone

Marielle Anzelone is an urban ecologist whose work centers on people’s daily connections with nearby nature and the role that design, education, and government can play in fostering this relationship. She is the founder and executive director of NYC Wildflower Week—an organization that produces cultural and educational programming to engage urbanites with the wilds of the Big Apple. Marielle is a regular contributor to the New York Times. She is also advancing local biodiversity policy. A bill that she helped develop, supporting native plants in public landscapes, became law in 2013. November 2014 she is launching a kickstarter campaign to support her public art installation PopUp Forest: Times Square. Filled with towering trees, native shrubs and wildflowers, the forest will give urbanites an immersive natural area experience in the most iconically un-natural place on the planet—coming June 2016.


Yunus Arikan

Yunus Arikan

Born in Ankara, Turkey in 1972. Graduated from TED Ankara College in 1990 and Middle East Technical University in 1994. As an environmental engineer, he has been primarily been involved in waste management and cleaner production. Between 2002-2008, he took an active role in promotion of progressive climate change policies in Turkey and Central and Eastern Europe, specifically in Turkey´s involvement in the international climate process and access to the Kyoto Protocol in 2009. Between 2009-2012, he acted as the Manager of the Cities Climate Center of ICLEI Local Governments for Sustainability, based in Bonn, Germany, as the focal point for Local Government and Municipality Constituency Authorities to the UNFCCC, Secretariat Director of the World Mayors Council on Climate Change and Manager of Bonn Center for Local Climate action and Reporting – carbonn. Since 2013 he is the Head of Global Policy and Advocacy at ICLEI, actively involved in leading ICLEI´s work at the United Nations, with intergovernmental agencies and at Multilevel Environmental Agreements. He is married and has two daughters.


Janice Astbury

Janice Astbury

Janice Astbury has over twenty years of experience in applied research, program design, management and evaluation within international organizations, philanthropic foundations, NGOs and community organizations. She has also been an educator in both formal (primary, secondary, post-secondary) and non-formal contexts and has participated in the design of several environmentally focused experiential education programs, including C-vert in Quebec and Canada World Youth’s Africa-Canada Eco-leadership program. Janice’s recent PhD research explored citizen engagement with urban nature and its contribution to enhancing social and ecological resilience in North West England. Other recent projects include supporting the development of the Canadian program Cities for People, research and development for The Nature Project in Quebec, evaluating the Manchester Carbon Literacy pilot project and contributing to a participatory evaluation of Proyecto Planteles Educativos Sustentables (sustainable campuses) in Morelos, Mexico. Janice is currently a ‘Community Research Assistant’ in the School of the Built Environment at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.


Tim Beatley

Tim Beatley

Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities
University of Virginia School of Architecture
Charlottesville, VA USA

Tim Beatley is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities, in the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, at the University of Virginia, where he has taught for the last twenty-five years. Much of Beatley’s work focuses on creative strategies by which cities and towns can fundamentally reduce their ecological footprints, while at the same time becoming more livable and equitable places. He is the author or co-author of more than fifteen books, including Green Urbanism, Native to Nowhere, Ethical Land Use, and his most recent book, Biophilic Cities. He holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Adrian Benepe

Adrian Benepe

Adrian Benepe
Senior Vice President, Director of City Park Development
The Trust for Public Land
New York City

Adrian Benepe has worked for more than 30 years protecting and enhancing New York City’s parks, gardens and historic resources, most recently as the Commissioner of Parks & Recreation. He continues this effort but now on a national level, as Senior Vice President for City Park Development for the Trust for Public Land, starting in that position in September, 2012. Serving as New York City Park Commissioner for the last ten and a half years, Adrian Benepe oversaw a major expansion of New York City’s parks system. During his tenure, he restored historic parks such as Central Park and Battery Park, added 730 acres of new parkland including Manhattan’s Highline, and laid the groundwork for an additional 2,000 park acres within the city. Prior to serving as Commissioner, Benepe worked as the Manhattan Borough Commissioner from 1996 to 2002. Adrian Benepe has earned a B.A. in English Literature from Middlebury College. In addition, he has earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Columbia University, where he was awarded a Pulitzer Fellowship. In 1987, he participated in the Mayor’s Top 40 Program, and in 1992 he was selected to participate in Leadership New York, a program of the Coro Foundation. Although born in New Rochelle, NY, he has lived in New York City since 1959.


Per Berg

Per Berg

Areas of interest
Resilient urban, rural and local community development. Ecologically adapted construction, technology and living. Futures studies on renewable energy, biological-and ecocycle technology, resource efficient and social transportation. Sustainable agriculture in regional-, local- and community scales. Blue-green fractal infrastructure. Pre-conditions for the dense-, green- and spacious pedestrian-speed city. Resilient, complex and contextual local areas’ physical, economic, biological, organisational, social, cultural and aesthetic resources.
Teaching
I teach at all the five years of the landscape architecture program. I have especially built two popular master-level courses at SLU. The first is the Landscape Project Studio – about the pre-conditions in the landscape for establishing resilient communities and infrasystems. The second is a new master course at SLU:s and Uppsala University’s joint master program in Sustainable Develoment: Interdisciplinary Practice. I also supervise Swedish and International students and PhD-students.
Research and development projects
I am involved in three Research Projects: Functional Density where I am leading the research about conditions for appropriate city planning: with integrated built-up areas, traffic, parks, squares, commerce and culture; Resilient Citylands – where we study modern cities with appropriate rural functions and modern rural areas integrated with urban functions; a study about Lawn – as a cultural and ecological phenomenon. I am the project leader since 1988 for the model area Hågaby – a resilient citylands area – planned and built according to the United Nation’s Habitat Agenda


Genie Birch

Genie Birch

Eugenie L. Birch FAICP, RTPI (hon), is Lawrence C. Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research, co-director, Penn Institute for Urban Research (Penn IUR) and co-editor, City in the 21st Century series, University of Pennsylvania Press. Dr. Birch earned her Master and PhD degrees in Urban Planning from Columbia University.

Dr. Birch’s has published widely on urban issues. Her most recent books are: Rebuilding Urban Places after Disaster, Lessons from Katrina (2006), Growing Greener Cities (2008), Global Urbanization (2011). Neighborhoods and Life Chances (2011), and Women’s Health and the World’s Cities (2011) co-edited with Susan Wachter and Urban and Regional Planning Reader (2009). Her articles have appeared the Journal of the American Planning Association, Journal of Planning Education and Research, Journal of Urban History, Journal of Planning History and Planning Magazine.

Dr. Birch has held many leadership positions in her field and in the civic arena. She served as president, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning; president, Society of American City and Regional Planning History; co-editor, Journal of the American Planning Association and chair, Planning Accreditation Board. She has been a commissioner, New York City Planning Commission, a member of the jury to select the designers of the World Trade Center site. She is currently chair, UN-HABITAT’s World Urban Campaign and president, Board of Directors, Municipal Art Society of New York.

Dr. Birch’s current research centers on two areas: knowledge dissemination related to urban planning and energy/sustainability and urban revitalization with a special focus on anchor institutions. Among ongoing her projects are developing knowledge-sharing platforms for energy efficient communities in Asia and energy efficient buildings in the EEB/Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster, the creation of a catalog of indicators of sustainable development in conjunction with the U.S. Partnership for Sustainable Communities and surveying energy issues related to food security. She has recently completed a study of universities and hospitals in the Northeast Corridor, to be published in Wachter and Zeuli, Revitalizing America’s Cities (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013).

Dr. Birch lives in New York City.


Diego Borrero

Diego Borrero

Diego Borrero Magana works to promote social inclusion and create better cities. He has advised governments on regulatory reform and competitiveness in Latin America, Africa and Europe. He is currently an advisor for the Just Cities initiative of the Ford Foundation. @diegoborrerom


Ben Bradlow

Ben Bradlow

Benjamin Bradlow is the Deputy Manager of the Secretariat of Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI), a transnational network of grassroots urban poor federation in 33 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. He has worked with the SDI secretariat in Cape Town, South Africa, since 2009. Previously, he was a journalist in Johannesburg, South Africa, and Philadelphia, United States, with a particular interest in urban community development and governance. He holds a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a BA in History from Swarthmore College.


Rebecca Bratspies

Rebecca Bratspies

Director, Center for Urban Environmental Reform
Professor of Law
City University of New York,
New York, NY USA

Rebecca Bratspies is a Professor of Law at the CUNY School of Law where she is the founding director of the CUNY Center for Urban Environmental Reform. She has published widely on regulating under conditions of uncertainty—with a focus on GMOs and corporate responsibility. Her recent scholarship focuses on questions of sustainability, and on the intersection of human rights and environmental regulation. She is a scholar with the Center for Progressive Reform, an appointed member of the ABA Standing Committee on Environmental Law, and a member of the Executive Committee of the American Association of Law Schools Section on the Environment.

Before entering academia, Professor Bratspies served as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable C. Arlen Beam of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. As a Henry Luce Foundation Scholar, Professor Bratspies spent a year seconded to the Republic of China (Taiwan) Environmental Protection Administration. She has taught at the University of Idaho, Michigan State University and NYU. She holds a BA in Biology from Wesleyan University and a J.D. cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania.


Kelly Brenner

Kelly Brenner is a naturalist, photographer and the author of The Metropolitan Field Guide, a website for thoughts, ideas and resources for the design of urban wildlife habitat. She holds a degree in Landscape Architecture from the University of Oregon and has an interest in habitat design and connecting people to nature. You can follow her on Twitter and Google+.


Jürgen Breuste

Jürgen Breuste

Dr. Jürgen Breuste is Head of the working group Urban and Landscape Ecology at the University of Salzburg, and founding President of the Society for Urban Ecology (SURE).


Taylor Britt

Taylor Britt

Taylor Britt works as the Special Projects and Research Manager at Houston Wilderness, a nonprofit that works to educate, convene, and provide problem-solving assistance on environmental issues in the Greater Houston Region. Houston Wilderness’ initiatives include a monthly Collaborative Access event on pertinent environmental topics, working with partners to package large-scale grant requests, creating media to educate adults and children on the value of nature, advocating a large-scale Greenbelt Network Vision in and around Houston, and compiling information on local ecosystem services knowledge. Taylor grew up loving the outdoors in Colorado before moving to Houston to complete a degree in History and Economics at Rice University, where he also got involved at the Baker Institute for Public Policy. He is an avid cyclist and (hopefully one day again in the future) skier.


Stephanie Britton

Stephanie Britton

Stephanie Britton is the founding Executive Editor of Artlink magazine, the visual arts quarterly established in 1981 in Adelaide, South Australia. Artlink has been a framework for ideas about the connections of art to society, and has given recognition to artists whose work reflects the major debates of the day. In its 35th year of publication, Artlink has explored the intersection of art practice with ecology and public space in several themed issues. Stephanie was awarded an AM in the Order of Australia in 2001 for services to the visual arts. In July 2014 she retired from the editorship to pursue independent art writing and publishing connections with Asia. She now lives in Byron Bay, NSW.


Joana Chan & Bryce DuBois

Joana Chan & Bryce DuBois

Joana Chan is a Doctoral Candidate in Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a Field Researcher with the University of Vermont. As an environmental social scientist, Joana’s research focuses on social-ecological resilience and urban agroecosystems. Currently, she is collaborating with the Cornell Civic Ecology Lab to examine the role of community gardens in post-Sandy New York City. Joana is also working with researchers from the USDA Forest Service and Ursinus College to explore the social-ecological functions of urban foraging by Chinese Americans in New York City. Joana has a background in environmental education and social justice work.

Bryce DuBois is a Doctoral Candidate in Environmental Psychology at the Graduate Center at CUNY. He spent his formative years exploring the hills and rivers of Berkshire County, through which he developed a love for the outdoors. Because of this affection, he has sought to incorporate his interests in the environment with his interest in psychology in his graduate work. Bryce has been involved in several projects relating to the use and meaning of public spaces and seeks to contribute to a critically oriented perspective on human-environment research and scholarship. Bryce is presently Extension Associate for the Civic Ecology Lab researching Post-Sandy greening and environmental education in New York, and research assistant on an ethnographic project critically examining Hurricane Sandy Recovery in the Rockaways. Finally, he is working on dissertation research about coastal restoration in NYC post-Sandy.


Anna Bubnova

Anna Bubnova

Anna Bubnova PhD student in Landscape Architecture at St. Petersburg State Forest Technical University, St. Petersburg, Russia. Anna was born in Chuvash Republic, Russia. She received her Bachelor and Master’s in Landscape Architecture from St. Petersburg State Forest Technical University. Then she entered the PhD program at the same university. Anna spent one year as an exchange PhD student in Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Currently Anna is working on the investigation of Green Roofs from the perspective of biodiversity and sustainability and completing her PhD thesis.


Pauline Bullen

Pauline Bullen

Pauline E. Bullen, PhD, is currently teaching in the Gender Development Department at the Women’s University of Africa, Zimbabwe. Pauline successfully defended her PhD thesis, “Facing Intolerance: Toronto Black University Students Speak on Race, Racism and in(e)(i)quity” in 2007 at OISE, University of Toronto, Canada. See, “The Continued Relevance of Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom”. Published in: Journal of College Teaching and Learning. First Quarter (January) 2012, Vol. 9 No. 1.


David Burg

David Burg

David L. Burg has been working on the environmental issues of New York and other metropolitan regions for over thirty years. A native of Southern Connecticut, he first started working as a professional naturalist in 1966, when he was a field assistant for the Department of Ornithology at Yale University. He subsequently worked odd jobs while hitch-hiking around North America, Central America, and Europe before resuming his naturalist career in New England and Israel. He was the first warden for the Norwalk Islands in Long Island Sound and the first naturalist for the Canoe Meadows Sanctuary in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Articles written by Mr. Burg have appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Sanctuary Magazine, Urban Audubon, and online. He has given presentations at several wildlife conferences, and his work protecting birds in New York City was featured on national television on CBS Sunday Morning. After having a second child, Mr. Burg switched careers and worked in real estate for several years. He and his family have lived in the Bronx since 1985.


Pedro Camarena

Pedro Camarena

Pedro Camarena is Landscape Architect who studied at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (1998) and has a Masters from the University of Lanús, Argentina (2009). He is cofounder of LAAP, where he has created works of landscape urbanism. He has held positions in various sectors of government, Ministry of the Environment of the City of Mexico (2001-2004). He has taught since 2001 at the Design Workshop at the Academic Unit of Landscape Architecture, Faculty of Architecture, served as advisor to the Ecological Reserve Pedregal in Ciudad Universitaria, UNAM and is president of the Society of Landscape Architects of Mexico (SAPM) 2013-15.


Kathryn Campbell

Kathryn Campbell

Manager, Healthy Parks Healthy People
Parks Victoria, Australia

Kathryn Campbell is Manager Healthy Parks Healthy People for Parks Victoria, having recently returned to Australia from a two year term as Programme Officer for Biodiversity and Health activities at the Convention on Biological Diversity (UNEP), in Montreal, Canada. Her work with Parks Victoria focuses on integrating the health benefits of parks and nature into everyday lives of Victorians so that they can reap the physical, mental and spiritual benefits of time spent in nature; healthy parks healthy people. She partners with governments, organizations and institutions and covers aspects of policy, programs, politics and implementation. Kathryn has 20 years experience in protected areas, parks and natural resource management with local authorities, sub-national governments and as a small business owner in Australia. Kathryn holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Science from Monash University and a Bachelor’s degree in Zoology from the University of Melbourne. She likes exploring new cities, spending time in nature with her family, and developing her visual arts skills that are inspired by nature.


Lindsay Campbell

Lindsay Campbell

Lindsay K. Campbell is a research social scientist with the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station. She is based at the New York City Urban Field Station, a partnership between the Forest Service and the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation. Her current research explores the dynamics of urban politics, stewardship, and sustainability policymaking. She is co-PI on several long term, interdisciplinary research projects. The Stewardship Mapping and Assessment Project maps the social networks and spatial turf of civic, government, and private actors working on environmental stewardship in New York City. The Living Memorials Project examines the use of open space post-September 11. Landscapes of Resilience explores stewardship of natural resources post-disturbance in Joplin, MO and New York City. She is a member of the NSF-funded ULTRA-EX team examining changes in land cover, ecosystem services, and stewardship in New York City’s urban forest. Dr. Campbell holds a BA in Public Policy from Princeton University, a Masters in City Planning from MIT, and a PhD in Geography from Rutgers University.


Maruxa Cardama

Maruxa Cardama

Maruxa co-founded Communitas, a coalition for sustainable cities and regions in the new UN Development Agenda. Earlier she run nrg4SD, an international organisation of subnational governments promoting sustainable communities, and co-facilitated the engagement of subnational and local authorities in the UN Rio +20 Conference. Previously she was Deputy Director at the representation of the South West of England to the EU where she led on the sustainability portfolio for a partnership of regional authorities, academia and the private sector. Before that, she started her career at the EU representation of the Spanish region of Galicia and the EU Committee of the Regions. Besides, Maruxa has worked as Expert on Governance and Public Administration Reform for the Government of Romania and The British Council. She has also lectured in capacity building programmes on EU sustainability policy and funding. In all, Maruxa has 12 years-experience on strategic policy analysis and advocacy, international partnerships, capacity building, and multi-level governance in the field of sustainable development at the international, national and subnational levels. Maruxa’s detailed profile is available at be.linkedin.com/pub/maruxa-cardama/3/73b/b74/


Paula Villagra & Carmen Silva

Paula Villagra & Carmen Silva

Paula Villagra, PhD, is a Landscape Architect that researches the transactions between people and landscapes in environments affected by natural disturbances. Carmen Paz Silva is a PhD student at Universidad Austral de Chile. Her current line of work is framed in urban ecology, and she is particularly interested in the effects of urbanization on biodiversity, using birds as a study model.


Lena Chan

Lena Chan

Director of the National Biodiversity Centre
National Parks Board of Singapore

Lena Chan is the Director of the National Biodiversity Centre (NBC), National Parks Board of Singapore. She leads a team of 30 officers who are responsible for a diverse range of expertise relevant to biodiversity conservation. Some of the initiatives that Lena has been working on include a) the development of the City Biodiversity Index, also known as the Singapore Index on Cities’ Biodiversity, b) the Pulau Tekong Coastal Protection and Mangrove Enhancement project, c) infusing biodiversity into urban landscapes, d) biodiversity and health, and e) access and benefit-sharing of genetic resources. Her current official duties also include being the National Focal Point for the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), a member of the Genetic Modification Advisory Committee of Singapore, a member of the Governing Board of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity, a member of the Advisory Committee for the Cities and Biodiversity Outlook of the CBD.


Vin Cipolla

Vin Cipolla

Vin Cipolla is a five-time entrepreneur, an eight-time company CEO and a two-time CEO of a major nonprofit. His current venture, RGV, is an incubator and venture company focused on design-driven businesses with renowned designer and architect David Rockwell. He is the President of the Municipal Art Society, where he founded the Committee for Urban Entrepreneurship. http://www.RGVLLC.com


Tim Collins

Tim Collins

Tim Collins is an artist, author and planner he has worked across art, science and philosophy for over twenty years. He has worked within a wide range of communities developing research, methods and practices that take best advantage of art and aesthetics in the public interest. He has developed research and artwork in the UK, USA and Europe. He has produced programmes and exhibitions, seminars and conferences that bring new ideas in art, philosophy and science to communities of interest. Over the last decade working with his partner Reiko Goto, Tim has been developing artwork, tools and technologies that attend to the silent, the invisible and the different temporal relationships that occur at the scale of forests and gardens. He has also begun a new body of work focused upon the inter-relationships between the internal ecology of the human body and the (chemical, material and poetic) conditions of the outside world.


Nette Compton

Nette Compton

Nette Compton is the Associate Director of City Park Development for the Trust for Public Land, where she oversees national urban park programs and initiatives including creative placemaking, design quality, sustainability, green infrastructure and climate change. She previously served at the NYC Parks Department as the Director of Green Infrastructure and project manager for the High Performance Landscape Guidelines. A registered Landscape Architect, she is the President of the American Society of Landscape Architects New York Chapter.


PK Das

PK Das

Architect-Activist
Mumbai, India

P.K. Das is popularly known as an Architect – Activist. His priority has been to establish a very close relation between architecture and people by involving them in a participatory planning process. His wide spectrum of work includes organizing slum dwellers for better living and evolving affordable housing models, engaging in policy framework for mass housing, reclaiming public space in Mumbai by developing the waterfronts, Re-envisioning the Open Spaces of Mumbai, urban renewal and conservation projects along with an architectural practice involving urban planning, urban design, architecture and interior design assignments across the country.

He is the Joint Convener of the Housing Rights Organization called Nivara Hakk Suraksha Samiti, Chairperson of the Mumbai Waterfronts Centre, Council member of the Indian National Trust of Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH), Mumbai chapter, member of the Steering Committee set-up by MMRDA for the preparation of a Vision Plan for the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, member of the National Advisory Council-Working Group on Alleviation of Urban Poverty including Rajiv Awaas Yojna (RAY) and founder of P.K. Das & Associates, a Planning & Architectural firm.

He has been widely published and has also delivered talks and lectures across the world. His work in the development of Mumbai’s coastline and his slum rehabilitation projects has won him several national and international awards including the first Urban Age Award instituted by the London School of Economics and Deutsche Bank conferred to the Mumbai Waterfronts Centre in which P.K. Das is the Chairperson. ‘Struggle for Housing – A people’s Manifesto’ and ‘A village called Puntamba, a Social-Architectural study’, ‘Vision Juhu-Expanding Public Spaces in Mumbai’, ‘On the Waterfront-Reclaiming Mumbai’s Open Spaces’, ‘Mumbai’s Open Spaces– Maps & A Preliminary Listing Document’ are some of the more known publications of Mr. Das

With an extremely strong emphasis on participatory planning, he hopes to integrate architecture and democracy to bring about desired social changes in the country.


Mark Davis

Mark Davis

Mark Davis is Dewitt Wallace Professor and Chair of Biology at Macalester College in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA, where he has taught since 1981. He has researched and written extensively on the topic of invasive species. His 2000 paper in the Journal of Ecology, in which he and colleagues proposed the fluctuating resource availability hypothesis to account for changes in invasibility in space and time has been cited more than 1800 times. He is the author of book Invasion Biology, published in 2009 (Oxford U Press) and was the lead author of the 2011 Nature essay urging conservationists to pay less attention to origins of species and much more attention to their effects. With his Macalester students and colleagues, he is currently conducting research on garlic mustard at the Macalester field station.


Geoffrey Davison

Geoffrey Davison

Dr. Geoffrey Davison is Deputy Director (Terrestrial) at the National Biodiversity Centre, National Parks Board of Singapore. He is also part of the Singapore delegation in the UNFCCC negotiations. He has written several books on birds. His latest book is “Wild Singapore”.


Barbara Deutsch

Barbara Deutsch

Executive Director, Landscape Architecture Foundation
Washington, DC, USA

Barbara has a diverse background in both the private and not-for-profit sector. She brings ten years of award-winning marketing experience from IBM before making a career change to become a landscape architect. This experience was influential in the development of LAF’s new strategic research initiative called The Landscape Performance Series.

Prior to LAF, Barbara worked on re-greening cities from Hong Kong to Washington, DC. She served most recently as an Associate Director for BioRegional’s OnePlanet Communities program in Washington, DC to deliver Zero Carbon, Zero Waste, Livable communities. In addition she served as Senior Director of Casey Trees where she led the 2002 Street Tree Inventory, Citizen Forester Program, and 1425 K Street Green Roof Demonstration Project. She was principal investigator for the award-winning EPA Grant titled “The Green Build-out Model: Quantifying the Stormwater Management Benefits of Trees and Green Roofs in Washington, DC”, which has helped inform EPA’s proposed new stormwater ruling and the District of Columbia’s stormwater planning and programs.

Barbara earned a BS in Commerce from the University of Virginia, a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Washington, and was awarded a Loeb Fellowship at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.


David Dixon

David Dixon

David Dixon FAIA leads Stantec’s new Urban Group. His work has won awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA), Congress for the New Urbanism, American Planning Association (APA) and other national organizations. In 2007 the AIA honored David with its Thomas Jefferson Medal for Public Architecture for “a lifetime of … significant achievement in [creating]… livable neighborhoods, civic spaces, and downtowns…” In 2012 Residential Architecture Magazine named David to their Hall of Fame, noting “he’s the person we call to ask about cities.”
David writes and speaks about issues like density, diversity facing rapidly changing cities and suburbs. The second edition of Urban Design for an Urban Century: Shaping More Livable, Equitable, and Resilient Cities, coauthored with Lance J. Brown FAIA, will be published by Wiley in Spring, 2014.
Before joining Stantec, David founded and led Goody Clancy’s planning and urban design practice, which won the APA’s 2013 Excellence in Planning Award to a Firm.


Paul Downton

Paul Downton

Architect, Writer, Urban Evolutionary
Prize-winning architect, writer, international speaker, green building and ecocity pioneer and early advocate for action on climate change. Paul Downton is DeTao Master of Ecological Urban Design with the DeTao Masters Academy in Shanghai and Chief Consultant with Green World Solutions (Beijing) Ltd. His projects include keynote green buildings for Adelaide Zoo and the ANU and the internationally awarded Christie Walk development. Founder of Urban Ecology Australia (in 1991), his vision of ecological cities is supported by years of working with communities. In 1989 Paul founded Australia’s first community organisation focused on climate change and was 2008 South Australian finalist for Australian of the Year. With a doctorate in environmental studies and 30 years teaching architecture, Paul is acknowledged as a world leader in sustainable city making and theory and has been called an Australian icon of sustainable development and a ‘neighbourhood pioneer’. His book ‘Ecopolis: Architecture and Cities for a Changing Climate’ was published in 2009. He is currently working on a series of books about ecocities.


Susannah Drake

Susannah Drake

Susannah is the founding principal of DLANDstudio architecture + landscape architecture pllc. DLANDstudio received the 2014 New Practices New York award from the NY AIA and was recently described as one of New York’s most promising young architects by New York.com. In 2013 she was awarded the National AIA Young Architects Award, Fellowship in the ASLA and recognized as an Architectural League Emerging Voice.

The firm received city, state, national and international design awards from the AIA, ASLA, BSA, and Chicago Athenaeum among others. With grants from foundations and public agencies dlandstudio redesigns underutilized infrastructure corridors for storm water capture, climate resilience and park development. DLANDstudio’s public projects include the QueensWay Greenway, MoMA Rising Currents Exhibit, BQGreen and the Gowanus Canal Sponge Park.

Susannah was the Cejas Scholar at Florida International University in 2014 and has taught at Harvard, Syracuse, City College and Cooper Union. Susannah received a Bachelor’s of Arts from Dartmouth College and Master in Architecture and Master in Landscape Architecture from the Harvard University GSD. She is a registered architect and registered landscape architect.


Thomas Elmqvist

Thomas Elmqvist

Professor & Theme Leader
Stockholm University & Stockholm Resilience Center
Stockholm, Sweden

Thomas Elmqvist, PhD, is a professor in Natural Resource Management at Stockholm University and Theme Leader at the Stockholm Resilience Center. His research is focused on ecosystem services, land use change, natural disturbances and components of resilience including the role of social institutions. He is coordinating a major interdisciplinary research themes as part of the Stockholm Resilience Centre focusing on governance and management of ecosystem services in urban landscapes, involving 12 cities around the world. He was involved in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and principal investigator of several multidisciplinary projects in Africa. He serves as associated editor for the journals Ecology and Society, Conservation and Society, Ambio and Sustainability Science. He is currently a co-chair of the Science Committee bioSustainability, as part of Diversitas and participate in the Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity project.


Jayne Engle

Jayne Engle

Jayne Engle is curator of Cities for People, an urban innovation network to create more resilient and livable cities. She has practiced participatory urban planning and development in many countries and contexts in the global north and south. A common thread that runs through her work is a commitment to inclusive and meaningful community engagement and progressive planning agendas that lead to creating more ecologically-healthy, people-centered cities. She has carried out most of her planning and policy work from within civil society organizations. Jayne was co-convenor of the Ecocity World Summit in 2011 in Montreal. She is currently a PhD candidate at McGill University School of Urban Planning investigating reconstruction and social change dynamics in post-earthquake Haiti, engaging participatory research methods. She holds a Master of Urban and Regional Planning and an MBA, and is a professional city planner in the US and Canada. Jayne currently lives in Montreal.


Ana Faggi

Ana Faggi

Argentine National Council of Research
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Ana Faggi is a researcher at the Argentine National Council of Research. She is also dean in the School of Ecological Engineering at the Flores University, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her research and teaching have been focused on regional ecology particularly on restoration and the conservation of biodiversity.


Martha Fajardo

Martha Fajardo

CEO, Grupo Verde
Cundinamarca, Colombia

Martha Cecilia Fajardo is a landscape architect and urbanist, and CEO of Grupo Verde, a company dedicated to the professional practice of landscape architecture, urbanism and urban design. Martha and her partner and Japanese husband Noboru Kawashima have planned, designed and implemented sound and innovative landscape architecture and city planning projects that enhance the relationship between people, the landscape, and the environment. In 1983 she founded and was the first President of the Colombian Society of Landscape Architects. From 2002-2006 she was President of the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA), the only professional body representing all landscape architects on a global level. She was the driver for IFLA working groups in Africa and membership expansion to India and China, countries which at the time were not members, both with significant cultural landscapes and large numbers of landscape architects. She chairs the Latin American Landscape Initiative working group. This work led to approval of landscape charters in several countries in Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela; as well as in West Africa, East Africa, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Martha is an instrumental Member of the IFLA/UNESCO International Landscape Convention Committee working towards an International Landscape Convention, supported by UNESCO, IUCN, ISOCARP, UIA and UN-Habitat.


Emilio Fantin

Emilio Fantin

Emilio Fantin is an artist working on dematerialization of art as his individual research and on the concept of organism in collective experiences. His work is mainly based on studying the problems of behaviour and philosophy. He has been carrying on a research about the structure of sharing art practices for many years. At the present time he is working on a multidisciplinary research which studies the relationship between art and agriculture, art and mathematical logic, art and dreams and art and architecture. He has participated in important contemporary art events (the Venice Biennale, I; Performa07, NY, USA; Le Magasin, Grenoble, F; Neue Galerie, Graz, A; Documenta XIII, Kassell, D).
Teaching (Since 2005): he teaches at the Politecnico, School of Architecture and Society, University of Milano and he also is one of the coordinators of the “Osservatorio Public Art”, a research laboratory which promotes projects and ideas about art in public spaces.


Mickey Fearn

Mickey Fearn

Mickey Fearn has been a parks, recreation, and conservation professional for over 45 years. He is currently a Professor of Practice in the North Carolina State University’s School of Natural Resources.

From 2009 to 2013 he served as the National Park Service’s Deputy Director for Communications and Community Assistance from 2008 until 20013. His responsibilities included Communications, Public Affairs, Strategic Planning, Youth Programs, International Affairs, Partnerships, Legislative and Congressional Affairs, Policy, State and Local Assistance Programs, and outreach and communications to groups currently underrepresented in park, recreations and conservation.

Before joining the National Park Service, Mickey worked in Seattle where he held positions as the Director of the City of Seattle’s Innovation Project, Executive Director of the Neighborhood Leadership Program, Manager of Seattle’s Race and Social Justice Initiative, and Director of Communication and Citizen Engagement in the Department of Parks and recreation. In addition, Mickey led the creation of the architecture to end youth violence in the City of Seattle, and developed programs Connecting young people with nature.

Mickey served as a Washington State Parks and Recreation Commissioner for 12 years. Prior to his work in Seattle, Mickey worked for the Governor of California, the California Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Mayor of Oakland California.

Mickey’s organizational interests include inclusion, collaboration, and innovation and creativity. Mickey earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Recreation and Park Administration from California State University and his Master of Science Degree in Recreation and Leisure Studies from the University of Oregon.


Barbara Finamore

Barbara Finamore

Natural Resources Defense Council
Hong Kong

BARBARA A. FINAMORE is a Senior Attorney and Asia Director at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). Ms. Finamore founded NRDC’s China Program, which promotes innovative policy development, capacity building and market transformation in China with a focus on climate, clean energy, environmental protection and urban solutions. Ms. Finamore has had over thirty years of experience in environmental law and energy policy, with a focus on China for the past two decades. Ms. Finamore served as President and Chair of the Professional Association for China’s Environment (PACE), and is the co-founder and President of the China-U.S. Energy Efficiency Alliance, a nonprofit organization and public-private partnership that works with China to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency. She holds a J.D. degree with honors from Harvard Law School.


Russell Galt

Russell Galt

Project Coordinator
South African National Biodiversity Institute
Cape Town

Russell Galt works for the South African National Biodiversity Institute based in Cape Town. His role entails working with government and research institutions to develop an African strategy for mobilizing policy-relevant biodiversity data, whilst strengthening regional collaboration and capacity in biodiversity informatics. Before joining SANBI, he managed ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability’s global biodiversity program, which entailed rendering advisory and advocacy services to city governments. He has also held positions in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Axiom Venture Capital, and Subsea Energy. He holds first-class degrees in law and science and has undertaken social-ecological field work in Nepal, India, South Africa, Morocco, Peru and China. He is a member of the Environment and Energy Commission of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) as well as the ICC Task Force on Green Economy.


Lloyd Godman

Lloyd Godman

Lloyd Godman is one of a new breed of environmental artists whose work is directly influencing ’green’ building design……”Godman’s installations are the result of a unique blend of botanical science, environmental awareness and artistic expression. All three elements are intrinsic to the practical realisation of his polymathic vision .. as physical objects, Godman’s artworks are purifiers of the air as well as the soul, suppliers of colour as well as calmness, and filters of water as well as the human spirit”. John Power – Editor of Facility Management Magazine


Julian Goh

Julian Goh

Julian Goh is the Director of the Centre for Liveable Cities in Singapore. He has extensive experience in both the public and private sector in the area of urban planning and development. He is currently a Director at the Centre for Liveable Cities (CLC), which is part of Ministry of National Development Singapore. At CLC, he is involved in research, training and advisory services. Prior to this, Mr Goh was with Siemens AG, Europe’s largest infrastructure and engineering company. He was the Head of Urban Planning & Smart City at Siemens, and a founding member of Siemens’ Global Centre for Competence on City Management. At Siemens, he combined his urban development know-how with the technological expertise of the company, to identify new innovative solutions for cities. Mr Goh started his career with the Urban Redevelopment Authority, with his last appointment as the Head of Physical Planning. He was responsible for coordinating and delivering Master Plan 2008, a strategic blueprint for the development of Singapore. In his career as an urban planner, he has involved in the planning of various large scale infrastructure projects such as mixed-use integrated developments, road/rail lines, and reclamation/coastal developments. Outside of his professional career, Mr Goh is also active in serving the community, as an appointed District Councilor for the Southwest District of Singapore.


David Goode

David Goode

Visiting Professor
Environment Institute
University College London

David Goode has over 40 years experience working in both central and local government in the UK and an international reputation for environmental projects, ranging from wetland conservation to urban sustainability.  He was Senior Ecologist at the Greater London Council, Director of the London Ecology Unit and latterly Head of Environment at the Greater London Authority.  He has been directly involved in developing the theory and practice of urban nature conservation, both as a professional ecologist and an enthusiastic naturalist.  He published Wild in London in 1986 and co-edited the Routledge Handbook of Urban Ecology, published in 2011.  He has worked in major cities in China, and in Santiago, Chile.  A Visiting Professor at University College London since 1994, he was Honorary Professor at East China Normal University from 1996-2001.  He is a member of the IUCN Specialist Group on Cities and Protected Areas.


Julie Goodness

Julie Goodness

Julie Goodness is a PhD candidate at the Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. Her research is in urban social-ecological systems, functional traits and ecosystem services, environmental education, design-thinking and design-based learning, social action and community development. Locations: Stockholm, Sweden; Cape Town, South Africa. Sge was a lead editor on the Cities and Biodiversity Outlook (CBO) Project: www.cbobook.org; and created the World Design Capital Cape Town 2014 Project -Youth Design Studio #WDC641: http://imagine-more.org/southafrica.html


Divya Gopal

Divya Gopal

Divya Gopal is a researcher at the Department of Ecology, Ecosystem Sciences/Plant Ecology at the Technical University, Berlin. She is currently focussing on cultural as a tool for conservation of urban greenery and the cultural relevance/usage of urban green spaces.


Alexandre Guertin

Alexandre Guertin

Following his landscape architecture studies in Montreal, Alexandre had the opportunity to travel and practice landscape architecture in Asia. With this experience came the need to concretely take action at the local level in the design of a greener city, which naturally led him to the Montreal Urban Ecology Center (MUEC). His horticultural knowledge and on the ground experience are now put to use as a landscape architecture consultant specializing in greening and urban agriculture. As such, he supports participatory projects from conception to completion. Alexandre’s passion on plants and the benefits of their broader usage in cities also made him a permaculture enthusiast with a focus on edible landscape design in the urban environment.

The MUEC is a local non-profit whose mission is to build and share expertise concerning the most viable and democratic approaches to sustainable urban development.


Irene Guida

Irene Guida

Irene Guida, PhD in Urbanism, is a researcher at IUAV Università di Venezia. Among her publications, L’Acciaio tra gli ulivi, Linkiesta, Milan (January 2012), is an experiment in sharing research to a common public, with high quality content. Her research has developed through many years from history of architecture to urban design and public art. She is currently teaching videography in the EMU Master Unity in Venice, directed by Paola Viganò.


Haripriya Gundimeda

Haripriya Gundimeda

Associate Professor
Department of Humanities and Social Sciences
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Powai, Mumbai

Dr. Haripriya Gundimeda is the chair of URBIO2012. She is the Co-cordinator of the report “The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity” for local and regional policy. She is also part of the Expert committee set up by Prime Minister under the chairmanship of Partha Dasgupta on Green Accounting. She holds a masters degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in Development Policy and work on various issues relating to environment and development economics. She is currently working as an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India. She
has also been a Visiting Scholar at the Institute of Behavioural Sciences, at the University of Colorado, Boulder, as well as a Ratan Tata Fellow at the Asia Research Centre, at the London School of Economics, and a Political Sciences and Visiting Researcher at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Her main areas of research have been green accounting, mitigation aspects of climate change, energy demand and pricing, valuation of environmental resources, and issues relating to the development in India.


Bram Gunther

Bram Gunther

Bram Gunther is the Chief of Forestry, Horticulture, and Natural Resources for the New York City Parks Department. He is also the President of the Natural Areas Conservancy, a new public/private partnership recently established to expand City efforts to conserve and restore thousands of acres of forests and wetlands. He joined the Parks Department in 1991 as an Urban Park Ranger, eventually becoming the Citywide Director. He transferred to Central Forestry and oversaw the growth of the division, including the creation of the Greenstreets and Green Infrastructure programs and the merger with the Natural Resources Group. In his current position, he creates and executes Parks policy and programs on forestry, horticulture, green infrastructure, and ecological conservation. He has a B.A. in American literature from State University of New York at Purchase and a M.S. in environmental management from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.


Amy Hahs

Amy Hahs

RBG’s Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology (ARCUE)
Dr Amy Hahs is the GIS Ecologist at the Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. Her research interests include landscape ecology; gradients of urbanisation; ecosystem services provided by large urban green spaces; and the composition and distribution of plants and animals in urban areas, including plant extinction debts. She is particularly interested in the spatio-temporal component of urbanisation and how these dynamics impact on the ecology of urban areas. She enjoys conducting research that contributes to the development of green, healthy cities and towns, and the conservation of resilient ecological systems in areas where people live and work.


Gareth Haysom

Gareth Haysom

Gareth Haysom is a researcher at the African Food Security Urban Network based at the African Centre for Cities at the University of Cape Town. Gareth’s research focuses primarily on issues of urban food governance in cities of southern Africa. A key output of this work is to encourage cities to play an active role in the food system.
In addition to his work with AFSUN, Gareth is a research fellow at the Sustainability Institute (linked to Stellenbosch University) where he set up a Sustainable Agriculture specialisation within the Sustainable Development post- graduate degree in 2008. This was arguably the first – and is possibly still the only – university programme that actively considered aspects such biodynamic agriculture and permaculture within the degree focus in South Africa.
Gareth’s key area of interest includes understanding the consequences and possible opportunities associated with the intersections between wider sustainability challenges, including the likes of ecosystem destruction and climate change, with urbanisation and changes in the food system.


Marcus Hedblom

Marcus Hedblom

Marcus Hedblom is a former strategic planner for recreation and conservation in Uppsala municipality. Now he is doing research of human perceptions of biodiversity in cities and ecosystem services in cities. He is also co-founder of a Swedish Think tank “Green cities”.


Noel Hefele

Noel Hefele, Independent artist, former research associate in the Studio for Creative Inquiry, Carnegie Mellon University. Noel is interested in the power of vision and what it means to embody what is seen. His current work focuses on cultural relationship to landscape as shared/common spaces. Noel received a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from Carnegie Mellon University and a Master of Arts and Ecology from Dartington College, UK. In 2013 and 2014 he was an artist in residence at the Barbuda Research Center in the Caribbean. He has exhibited internationally and has work in many private collections. He serves on the board of a non-profit community arts organization in the neighborhood where he lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. www.noelhefele.com.


Cecilia Herzog

Cecilia Herzog

President
INVERDE

Instituto de Estudos, Pesquisas e Projetos em Infraestrutura Verde e Ecologia Urbana
Asssociate Professor at PUC-Rio (Pontifícia Universidade católica do Rio de Janeiro)
Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL

Cecilia Herzog is the president and co-founder of Inverde Institute, which aims to educate and raise public awareness about green infrastructure and the role of biodiversity and ecosystems services in cities to build resilience and lower the ecological footprint. She researches how different cities in the world have transformed their landscapes to support biodiversity providing a better quality of life to people in harmony with nature. In the last four years she has been determined to bring an ecological culture to the Brazilian urban scene through various means, such as promoting monthly lectures in various fields in Rio de Janeiro, lecturing in different cities and writing in Portuguese about bringing nature back to the cities. She has been working to change the local current trend of globalized modernist landscapes and the elimination of native biodiversity and wetlands. Among other projects, Cecilia is collaborating with the Environmental City Department to develop and support the Ecological Corridors planning for the city of Rio de Janeiro (Mosaico Carioca).


Oliver Hillel

Oliver Hillel

Programme Officer
Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity

Oliver Hillel has been a Programme Officer at the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD, administered by the United Nations Environment Programme) in Montreal, Canada, for the last 6 years. He is responsible for the issues of South-South cooperation, sub-national implementation (involvement of States, Regions and cities), Sustainable Tourism, and Island Biodiversity. A biologist with a master’s Degree in Environmental Education and MBAs on Managerial Accounting and Hotel Management, Oliver has over 24 years’ experience on international cooperation and negotiations on sustainable tourism, event organization, and training and capacity building programs across many themes and issues related to sustainable development. Previously, he was the team leader for a tourism development cooperation project in the Philippines, Tourism Programme Coordinator for UNEP’s Division of Technology, Industry and Economics based in Paris, France, and Ecotourism Program director for Conservation International. He also worked for SENAC, a professional training institution in his home country Brazil, where he created and managed training and consulting services for hotels, restaurants, and theme parks. For the past 6 years, Oliver has coordinated the SCBD’s activities involving cities and subnational authorities, supporting negotiations that led to the adoption of a Plan of Action for Subnational Governments, Cities and other Local Authorities. He has also co-organized more than 15 meetings including three Cities and Biodiversity Summits parallel to meetings of the Conference of the Parties, and produced the Cities and Biodiversity Outlook, a reference publication on the links between urbanization and biodiversity.


Katie Holzer

Katie Holzer

Katie Holzer has been researching urban natural areas for eight years. Her goal is to increase understanding of natural area management to serve humans and other species. Her research focuses on designing and managing wetlands in cities to provide water filtering and flood control services, habitat for frogs and salamanders, and educational and recreational opportunities for people. She has worked as an environmental educator in Portland, Oregon, USA where she connected urban youth to their local habitats and started a citizen science amphibian monitoring program. Her dissertation research looks at habitat features associated with amphibian success in urban areas in Oregon, California, and Southeast Asia. A major focus of her dissertation is the role of invasive plant and animal species in these areas.


Whitney Hopkins

Whitney Hopkins

Trained as a biologist, product designer, and architect, and with a diverse work background from wildland fire and field ecology to ranch management, Whitney Hopkins has a unique set of skills that she pulls into design. She believes that design of all kinds can change the world by making meaningful products and places that respect both people and the planet.
Whitney has a BA in Human Biology and a BS in Product Design Engineering from Stanford and a Masters of Architecture from Parsons. She co-founded Ground Design Lab to bring ecology and human-centered design research into the architectural process. Additionally, she co-founded 4b Collective to push the conversation around design and gender. She specializes in design research, strategy, and bringing empathy and science into the design process and has expertise in sustainability and biomimicry.


Mark Hostetler

Mark Hostetler

Professor, Department of Wildlife Ecology & Conservation
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL USA

With over twenty years of experience in urban wildlife and green development issues, Dr. Mark Hostetler conducts research and outreach on how urban landscapes could be designed and managed, from small to large scales, to conserve biodiversity. He has extensive experience in working with homeowners, developers, and policy makers on ways to manage and design residential developments for biodiversity. Dr. Hostetler co-founded University of Florida’s Program for Resource Efficient Communities and collaborates with an interdisciplinary team of scientists and graduate students. Dr. Hostetler works with policy makers, developers, and homeowners to establish natural resource conservation strategies in communities that are billed as “green” developments. In particular, he conducts a national continuing education course on conserving biodiversity in subdivision development, and he has recently published a book titled, The Green Leap: A Primer for Conserving Biodiversity in Subdivision Development.


Mike Houck

Mike Houck

Executive Director
Urban Greenspaces Institute
Portland, OR USA

Mike Houck, Director of the Urban Greenspaces Institute (http://www.urbangreenspaces.org), has worked on local, regional, and national urban park and greenspace issues since 1980 when he founded the Urban Naturalist Program at the Audubon Society of Portland (http://www.audubonportland.org). He is co-founder of The Intertwine Alliance (http://www.theintertwine.org), which is dedicated to creating a world-class park, trail, and natural area system for the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan region. The Alliance is also a member of the national Metropolitan Greenspaces Alliance whose members represent Chicago, Los Angeles, Houston, Cleveland, Milwaukee, San Francisco Bay Area, and Portland metropolitan greenspace initiatives.


Glen Hyman

Glen Hyman

Center for the Sociology of Organizations
SciencesPo
Paris, France

Glen Hyman is a Deputy Chair of the Urban Specialist Group of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas, which provides informal technical and policy advice on the interdependence of urban people and their natural environments. Glen’s academic research is similarly focused on the governance of relationships between nature and cities. With a humanities degree from the University of Chicago, a Geography Masters from the Université de Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV), he is currently concluding his doctoral work at Sciences Po with the Center for the Sociology of Organizations CSO. His thesis is a comparative study of the consequences of introducing UNESCO Biosphere Reserves near urban areas in Australia, Canada and South Africa.


Maria E Ignatieva

Maria E Ignatieva

Professor of Landscape Architecture
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Uppsala, Sweden

Dr. Maria Ignatieva is Professor of Urban Ecology and Design at the Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences. She has worked extensively in Russia, the United States, New Zealand and recently in Sweden. Maria’s current interests include ‘putting nature back into neighborhoods’, theoretical, methodological and practical approaches to sustainable landscape design in the era of globalization with an emphasis to urban biodiversity and design. She also experienced in of landscape architecture, restoration and conservation of historical parks and gardens.


Keitaro Ito

Keitaro Ito

Associate Professor
Lab. of Environmental Design, Department of Civil Engineering,
Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan

Keitaro is Associate Professor of the Lab. Environmental Design, Civil Engineering at Kyushu Institute of Technology. He has studied and worked in Japan, U.K. and Germany. He has interest in ecological landscape design. Keitaro lives in Fukuoka-city in south part of Japan. In these 15 years, he has been interested in nature restoration in urban areas, river restoration, gardens in primary schools, forest parks and urban parks. He sometimes enjoys longboard surfing and walking in the mountain out of the city—this is one of the important reasons to think about nature preservation and restoration.


Chris Ives

Chris Ives

RMIT University
Melbourne, Australia

Chris Ives is a postdoctoral research fellow at RMIT University in Melbourne. Chris takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying the ecological and social dynamics of cities. He received his PhD in 2012 from Macquarie University, Sydney, where he undertook research on the biodiversity and planning policy of urban riparian systems. After this, Chris studied the values of peri-urban agricultural landscapes while working at the University of Melbourne. His current research is focused on understanding and planning for multiple values of urban green space, and analysing the biodiversity impacts of urban growth in Australia. Chris is part of the National Environmental Research Program: an Australian Government initiative to support environmental decision-making and provide research relevant to policy applications.


Madhumitha Jaganmohan

Madhumitha Jaganmohan

Madhumitha is a scientist at the Department of Landscape Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig. She is also a PhD student at Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg. Her current research is focused to study the effects of spatial configuration of urban green spaces and biodiversity on the cooling effects of green spaces in the city of Leipzig. She obtained her Master’s degree in Environmental Science in 2011 from Bangalore University, India. Previously, she has worked at Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE) Bangalore from 2008 – 2013. She was involved in the comprehensive investigation of urban biodiversity in Bangalore which encompasses research on various land uses of the city.


Madhusudan Katti

Madhusudan Katti

Associate Professor of Vertebrate Ecology
Dept of Biology
California State University, Fresno
USA

I am an evolutionary ecologist who discovered birds as an undergrad after growing up a nature-oblivious urban kid near Bombay, went chasing after vanishing wildernesses in the Himalaya and Western Ghats as a graduate student, and returned to study cities grown up as a reconciliation ecologist. I study ecological and evolutionary processes in more or less human dominated ecosystems with the goal of applying our understanding of these processes towards reconciling biodiversity conservation with human development. I am Project Leader of the multidisciplinary Urban Long-Term Research Area – Fresno And Clovis Ecosocial Study (ULTRA-FACES) project, where we study the interactions between water policy, human water use, and urban biodiversity, and Co-Principal Investigator of an NCEAS (National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis) Working Group on the comparative ecology of urban biodiversity worldwide. Other research in my laboratory addresses the behavioral consequences of human activities on other species, such as the effects of urban noise on bird song, and the foraging ecology of mammals and birds in cities. I am a Guest Editor for a special forthcoming issue of Cities and the Environment journal focusing on the ULTRA network. I serve on the Board of Directors of Fresno Audubon Society, the Science Advisory Board of Desert Biodiversity, the Advisory Board of Current Conservation and the Editorial Board of Indian Birds. I try to make science part of our cultural mainstream through the Central Valley Café Scientifique, the Fresno Bird Count, and my primary blog.


Noboru Kawashima

Noboru Kawashima

Grupo Verde
Bogotá, Colombia

Noboru Kawashima is a Japanese Biologist, Urbanist and Landscape Architect, living in Colombia as Grupo Verde Ltda Vice-president. More than 30 years of experience in leadership roles nationally and internationally, playing a key role in strengthening friendly urbanism, with a focus on urban design practice, and Environmental Planning. Extensive experience in Japan and consulter in Latin America trough Transportation and Infrastructure.

GVL is a company which drives, coordinates, designs and advises innovative processing and analysis of the territory from landscape, to ecology, creativity urbanism, to biology and technology, geography to economics, art to participation, always adapted to the local reality.


Radhika Khosla

Radhika Khosla

Centre for Policy Research
New Delhi, India

Dr. Radhika Khosla is a Fellow at the Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi. Her research areas are in energy efficiency, with a focus on the buildings sector, and more broadly on energy and climate change issues. She formally worked with the Natural Resources Defense Council as a Staff Scientist based in New York, where she helped build the organization’s India Initiative. Previously, she worked with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, The Climate Group, and the Center for Advanced Studies on India at the University of Pennsylvania on a range of issues including India’s built environment. Radhika has an undergraduate and master’s degree in Physics from the University of Oxford and Ph.D. in Geophysical Sciences from the University of Chicago.


Chankook Kim

Chankook Kim

Chankook KIM is an assistant professor in the department of environmental education at Korea National University of Education. He is also a fellow of Asian Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (AIEES) in Seoul. He received his Ph.D. degree in human dimensions of environment & natural resources from The Ohio State University, USA. His research areas sit at the intersection of environmental studies and environmental education, including climate change education, education for sustainability and environmental communication on environmental issues. In the area of environmental education, his research interests cover how citizens understand scientific information on environmental issues and how educators deal with the issues in their teaching and learning contexts.


Tori Kjer

Tori Kjer

Tori Kjer, PLA, is the Program Director for the Trust for Public Land’s Los Angeles Program. She oversees the wide range of urban park and land protection projects implemented by The Trust for Public Land throughout Los Angeles County. Tori holds a Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture from CSU Pomona.


John Kostyack

John Kostyack

Vice President, Wildlife Conservation
National Wildlife Federation
Washington, DC USA

John Kostyack is Vice President of Wildlife Conservation for the National Wildlife Federation, where he leads NWF’s wildlife and habitat programs. A key focus of his work is protecting people and wildlife from intensified flooding and other harmful impacts of climate change. He also leads campaigns to protect and restore important Western landscapes, the Appalachian forests, aquatic ecosystems, and urban and suburban habitats.

John frequently writes and lectures on meeting the challenges of conserving U.S. wildlife and ecosystems in a warming world. His most recent publication, in the September 2011 issue of BioScience, outlines policy solutions for facilitating movement of plants and animals in a changing climate. He serves on the board of the American Wind Wildlife Institute, a unique NGO-industry collaboration focused on developing wildlife-friendly wind energy.

John is a longtime leader on Endangered Species Act policy. He helped to win the endangered species conservation tax incentive for private landowners passed by Congress in 2008 and has won a series of important court rulings for wildlife through his legal advocacy, some of which have led to national conservation policy improvements.


Marianne Krasny

Marianne Krasny

Marianne Krasny is professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Director of the Civic Ecology Lab at Cornell University. Through her research and outreach, she works with community-based organizations to examine how self-organized, environmental stewardship practices in cities contribute to civic renewal, ecosystem services, multi-generational learning, and social-ecological systems resilience. She also directs EPA’s national environmental education training program (“EECapacity”), through which she fosters exchange of ideas between urban community environmental stewards and environmental educators, with the goal of redefining environmental education for an increasingly urban society facing the realities of climate change. Recent edited books include Trading Zones in Environmental Education: Creating Transdisciplinary Dialogue and Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems: the Role of Learning and Education. A forthcoming book is entitled Civic Ecology: Adaptation and Transformation from the Ground Up (ME Krasny and KG Tidball, MIT Press). Email:


Alex Kudryavtsev

Alex Kudryavtsev

Alex Kudryavtsev is an online course instructor for EECapacity, an EPA-funded environment educator training project led by Cornell University and NAAEE (PI: Marianne Krasny). Alex grew up in Russia. He finished his MS. and PhD at Cornell focusing on urban environmental education and sense of place in the Bronx, New York City. Alex is facilitating a national online community of 50+ educators who are co-writing an e-book on urban environmental education. Alex’s research interests include environmental psychology, urban environment, green urbanism, and environmental education.


Jim Labbe

Jim Labbe

Urban Conservationist
Audubon Society of Portland

Urban Conservationist at Audubon Society of Portland (www.audubonportland.org) since 2003, Jim grew up enjoying west Portland’s nature-rich neighborhoods. He has more than 20 years of experience in natural resource planning, research, and advocacy as a student, watershed council coordinator, consultant, citizen advocate and general Oregon enthusiast. He holds a B.A. in history from Reed College and an M.S. in Physical Geography from Portland State University. His past research includes a history of the Rogue River Salmon Fishery and a study of river channel morphology in the Tualatin River Watershed, the latter published in Geomorphology in 2011. In 2005 he authored a chapter in the Coalition for a Livable Future’s Regional Equity Atlas that assessed access to parks and nature in the Portland-Metro region and disparaties related to race and class. Since 2003 he has staffed Audubon’s East Portland branch office at Leach Botanical Garden.


Todd Lester

Todd Lester is an artist and cultural producer. He has worked in leadership, advocacy and strategic planning roles at Global Arts Corps, Reporters sans frontiers, and Astraea Lesbian Justice Foundation. He founded freeDimensional and Lanchonete.org—a new project focused on daily life in the center of São Paulo. Todd is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute; a co-curator for the Arts & Society Team of Cities for People in Canada; and serves on the board of arts, rights and literary organizations in India, Mexico, Brazil and the US.


Deborah Lev

Deborah Lev

Deborah Lev has devoted her career to natural resource management in cities large and small, from New York City to Portland, Oregon. She currently holds the post of City Nature Manager for Portland Parks & Recreation where she oversees natural areas, urban forestry, and community gardens. Her portfolio includes management of over 3,000 hectares of natural areas. A stewardship program involves community members in controlling invasive plants, revegetation and trail maintenance, and environmental education programs introduce children and teens to the natural world and environmental careers. Deborah’s City Nature Department regulates over one million park trees and 200,000 street trees and is responsible for implementing the City’s Urban Forest Management Plan. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Intertwine Alliance, a regional conservation partnership. She also served for six years on the Board of Directors of the Society for Ecological Restoration International. Deborah studied planning and forest ecology; she holds an M.S. Degree in forest ecology from the University of Washington.


Lesley Lokko

Lesley Lokko

Architect, Academic, Novelist
Accra, Johannesburg, London

LESLEY LOKKO is an architect, academic and the author of eight best-selling novels. She studied at the Bartlett School of Architecture and Planning, University College London, graduating in 1995 with a BSc(Arch) and DipArch, before going on to gain her PhD from the University of London in 2007.
She has taught a numerous schools of architecture in the US (Iowa State University and the University of Illinois at Chicago); the UK (Bartlett School of Architecture, Kingston University, London Metropolitan University and the University of Greenwich), as well as South Africa, where she was Visiting African Scholar at the University of Cape Town. She was the Martin Luther King Visiting Professor of Architecture at the University of Michigan and has, since 2004, been Visiting Professor at the University of Westminster. In 2000, she edited White Papers, Black Marks: Race, Culture, Architecture (University of Minnesota Press, 2000) and since then, has ben an on-going contributor to discourses around identity, race, African urbanism and the speculative nature of African architectural space and practice. She was a founding member of ThirdSpace, a UK-based collective that researched the relationship between architecture, globalisation and cultural identity, and was a co-founder of the current MArch programme at the University of Westminster, Architecture, Cultural Identity and Globalisation (MACIG). She is an active participant in the UCT-funded Centre for the Study of African Cities, and is a regular juror at international competitions and symposia, most recently at EUROPAN (Vienna 2009); Blueprints of Paradise (Amsterdam 2012) and ArchiPRIX International (Moscow 2013).
In 2004, she made the successful transition from academic to novelist with the publication of her first novel, Sundowners (Orion 2004), a UK-Guardian top forty best-seller, and has since then followed with eight further best-sellers, which have been translated in fifteen languages. For over a decade, she has juggled two very different careers simultaneously, though not always smoothly.


Nik Luka

Nik Luka

An Associate Professor cross-appointed to McGill University’s Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning, Nik Luka is also Vice-President of the Board of Directors of the Montréal Urban Ecology Centre. He specialises in transdisciplinary approaches to understanding urban form and cultural landscapes with a particular interest in the everyday interfaces of nature and culture as experienced by individuals. Trained as an architect and planner, with a Ph.D. in urban and cultural geography, Luka works extensively on community-based design processes—including adaptive strategies for making infrastructure fit well into local contexts—as well as housing, residential mobility, and the dynamics of periurban spaces. At McGill University, he is also affiliated with the School of Environment, the Institute for Health and Social Policy, the Trottier Institute for Sustainability in Engineering and Design, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Montréal.


Miguel Luna

Miguel Luna

Miguel A. Luna is native of Colombia, an avid reader and longtime advocate of community playing an active role in city, state and nationwide policies. An urban resident of Los Angeles for 25 years, he’s been commuting mostly on bike and public transportation after giving up his car in 2005. He specializes in cultivating relationships with and between community-based organizations, businesses, elected officials, environmental organizations, academia, governmental agencies, and individual stakeholders at the grass-roots level. He is the founder of Urban Semillas and a Principal at DakeLuna Consultants. In 2013, Mr. Luna was featured by High Country News for his work in creating job opportunities for inner-city youth in the field of water quality monitoring: http://bit.ly/watermiguel. You can find out more about Miguel here: http://about.me/miguelluna.


Shuaib Lwasa

Shuaib Lwasa

Lecturer, Department of Geography
Makerere University
Kampala, Uganda

Shuaib Lwasa is a Lecturer in the department of geography at Makerere University. Shuaib has over 14 years of teaching and international research experience working on inter-disciplinary research. Recent works are in the fields of urban environmental management, spatial planning in with special interest in livelihood systems, vulnerability to global environmental change, disaster risk management and sustainable urban development. Recent publications topics include adaptation to climate change, land and property rights, land use and land cover change, vulnerability assessment, resource efficiency and spatial planning and sustainable urban development. Shuaib coordinates the Habitat Universities (H UNI) climate change and disaster risk management Hub. He has participated on international panels focused on urbanization and environmental change with a focus on Africa’s urbanization.


Kathryn Lwin

Kathryn Lwin

Kathryn Lwin is the Founder Director of the River of Flowers, launched in December 2008 as a project of the Archway Herbal Clinic, London where she was Clinic Director. River of Flowers is now a nonprofit, eco-social enterprise working with community groups and other organisations to create trails or ‘rivers’ of wildflowers and wild flowering trees as forage and habitat for bees and other pollinators in cities. River of Flowers curates native wild plant species for specific urban locations, advises on planting style and on growing wild plants with food.
Kathryn is responsible for the Strategic and Creative Development of River of Flowers, and is the main writer for the Wild City Blogs, River of Flowers publications and the website. She also shares her thoughts on wildflowers, pollinators and other matters on the @RiverofFlowers Twitter page. Passionate about the need to preserve wildflowers and their pollinators in the challenging city environment, Kathryn believes that spaces for growing food for pollinators and humans should be an integral part of the design of the sustainable city.
Having been awarded a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship in 2013, Kathryn spent two months in North America, researching innovative and inspiring projects growing wild and edible plants in the urban landscape. The cities she visited included New York, Toronto, Chicago, Milwaukee and San Francisco all part of her extensive journey to find examples of great ideas and good practice to share. Kathryn is currently writing a book on her experiences.


Patrick Lydon

Patrick Lydon

Artist
San Jose, USA

An artist and writer, Patrick works both individually and with diverse casts of people and organizations, to ignite unconventional and critical dialogue on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. His work takes place at the intersection of culture and ecology, and is contextually focused on issues in contemporary urban [built] environments.

His projects engage diverse casts of individuals, from farmers, to city planners, to artists, rural and urban community organizations, and educational institutions. Over the past several years, he has worked on projects variously in Japan, Korea, United Kingdom, and the United States.

In addition to public and venue-based art projects, Patrick is founder and co-director of the Final Straw project (www.finalstraw.org), a documentary and active international community dialogue about food, earth, and happiness.

Patrick was a visiting postgraduate student at Aichi University of Art (Japan) where he created [HUMAN:NATURE], a project exploring the relationships between people and nature in a small island community, using combined methods of research and creative practice. He holds a BA from San Jose State University, and an MFA in ’Art, Space, and Nature’ from the University of Edinburgh, School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.


Yvonne Lynch

Yvonne Lynch

Yvonne is an urban climate adaptation policy expert and communications strategist.
She leads the Urban Ecology and Urban Forest Team at the City of Melbourne. The team focus is ecosystem led adaptation for climate resilience and citizen engagement through transparency and participation. She has developed and led some of the most progressive climate change policies and initiatives for the city including the implementation of the Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, the strategic development of the 1200 Buildings Program, securing a legislative amendment to initiate Australia’s first Environmental Upgrade Agreement, developing the Urban Forest Strategy and the Tree Protection Policy. She has commissioned Melbourne’s first research on sea-level rise, white roofs, dendrochronology to assess the effects of climate impacts. These projects have received awards nationally from the United Nations Association of Australia, The Banksia Foundation and the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Centre and internationally from the C40 Cities Program.


Andre Mader

Andre Mader

Local Action for Biodiversity
Convention on Biodiversity
Montreal, Canada

Andre Mader is a South African conservation biologist, working at the interface of biodiversity policy and practice. He has an MSc in Conservation Biology from the University of Cape Town. In the years between and since, he has worked in various parts of South Africa, the Middle East and Canada as researcher, “wildlife breeding technician”, land manager, trainer and project officer – always with conservation as the centre of activities. Since 2006 Andre has been working with local governments on technical and advocacy aspects of ICLEI’s Local Action for Biodiversity programme, which led to his current secondment to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, where he works with Oliver Hillel – another contributor to this forum. His career focus is on identifying gaps in current understanding of how to reach the ambitious twin goals of conservation and development. He is a firm believer that local authorities, especially those who govern cities, have a critical and, as yet, unexploited part to play.


Anjali Mahendra

Anjali Mahendra

Dr. Anjali Mahendra is Strategy Head for Research and Practice at EMBARQ, the Cities and Transport program of the World Resources Institute in India. Anjali has 10+ years of experience in urban planning, transportation policy, and regional economic development and has worked in the U.S, Europe, India and Latin America. At EMBARQ, she is leading research on climate mitigation through transport measures, transport financing strategies, health impact assessments for transport projects, impacts of urban form on travel behavior, transport governance issues, etc. She is currently Lead Expert for the Communitas Coalition’s work group on universal access to basic infrastructure services, pushing for an urban sustainable development goal (SDG) in the post-2015 development agenda. Anjali has a master’s degree in City Planning, an M.S. in Transportation, and a Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning, all from MIT, USA, and is trained as an architect from the School of Planning and Architecture, India.


Jack Maher

Jack Maher

Jack Maher is a Princeton-in-Asia fellow with NRDC Beijing’s Sustainable Cities team focusing on smart growth and sustainable urban planning in China. At NRDC he has conducted an ongoing project researching the pedestrian-friendliness of Chinese cities and compiled guidelines for sustainable urban development in China. A Boston native, he is a 2012 graduate of Middlebury College in Vermont. During his time at Middlebury, Jack majored in Political Science and Chinese, studied abroad in Beijing, and rowed for 4 years on the crew team. Prior to joining NRDC’s Beijing office, he worked at a corporate law firm in Boston.


Elliott Maltby

Elliott Maltby

Ms. Elliott Maltby is a founding partner of thread collective, a multi-disciplinary collaborative design studio that explores the seams between building, art, and landscape. Her current work defines the idea of the urban backstage, both conceptually and through design proposals. The backstage is the shadow or counterpoint of branded public space, a space to be found and explored, to wonder about, to wander around, a place to speculate. A survey of New York City backstage spaces demonstrates a common pairing of productive spontaneous ecologies and aging infrastructure; these are novel landscapes. Rather than seeing them as derelict or underutilized, she is interested in documenting and supporting the stealth success of these spaces. She is also a Visiting Associate Professor of Graduate Architecture and Urban Design at the Pratt Institute. Since 2009, she has been an active board member of iLAND [interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art Nature and Dance]. With founder Jennifer Monson, she has been developing an innovative platform for cross-disciplinary collaboration for researching New York City’s urban ecology.


Francois Mancebo

Francois Mancebo

Director of the IRCS and IATEUR
Paris, France

François Mancebo is the director of the International Research Center on Sustainability (IRCS) and of the Institute of Regional Development, Environment and Urban Planning (IATEUR). Full professor of urban planning and sustainability at Rheims University, he is at the origin of the Rencontres Internationales de Reims en Sustainability Studies, an annual event (www.sustainability-studies.org).

His research aims at determining the conditions of urban transitions to sustainability. He considers planning as an adaptive process subject to continuous adjustments which address primarily governance and policy making. He points that, while sustainability policies are supposed to meet simultaneously environmental justice, and intergenerational equity (preservation of the resources and protection of the planet for the generations to come), usually it doesn’t work. He considers that the more adequate framework to address this antagonism is boundary work and participatory joint fact-finding, associating scientists, staff advising relevant policy makers, local communities and other stakeholders.. This issue is the backbone of a longer-term endeavor: building a consistent theoretical framework for sustainable development.

François Mancebo is senior research fellow of the IHDP Earth System Governance. He held the Chaire de la France Contemporaine at the Université de Montréal. He also was science adviser to the LCPC (French National Public Works Research Laboratory). He holds HDR (post PhD capacity degree to supervise research programs) on sustainable development from the Sorbonne university, and a PhD from Toulouse university. He started his academic career as associate professor at Paris Sorbonne University in 2000. Then was full professor at Grenoble 1 University from 2004 to 2009, when he joined Rheims university. His book ”Le développement durable” received the Logerot prize of the French Society of Geography, in 2006. He is member of the planning section of the French CNU (National Universities Council) and holder of the PES (French Scientific Excellence Premium).


Pepe Marcos-Iga

Pepe Marcos-Iga

Pepe Marcos-Iga has over 15 years of international experience as an environmental communicator and educator, with a background in capacity building, cultural competencies development, and online training and networking. As the International Programs Manager at the Environmental Education Exchange, he has managed a wide array of bilingual networking and capacity building efforts for environmental educators along the US-Mexico Border, reaching thousands of educators both sides of the border. He is currently a member of the EECapacity Leadership Team, a project funded by EPA in partnership with Cornell University and NAAEE. Pepe has served on NAAEE’s board since 2007, expanding and diversifying the organization’s reach. Pepe holds a Ph.D. and a M.Sc. in Natural Resources with a focus on Environmental Learning from the University of Arizona, as well as a M.Sc. and Bachelor Degree in Communications and Media Arts from Monterrey Tech and University of Monterrey respectively.


Juana Mariño

Juana Mariño

Program Coordinator for Policy, Legislation and Decision Making
Alexander Von Humboldt Institute for Research on Biological Resources
Bogotá, Colombia

Juana Mariño Drews is the Program Coordinator for Policy, Legislation and Decision Making at the Alexander Von Humboldt Institute for Research on Biological Resources, Colombia’s national biodiversity and ecosystem research institute. Juana holds degrees in architecture and management from the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. She is a former Director of Population and Land Use Planning at the Ministry of the Environment in Colombia, and has over 20 years of experience consulting on urban and rural planning for public and private entities in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Nicaragua. She has been a professor and lecturer, teaching undergraduate courses at the School of Architecture and Industrial Design in Panamá City, and graduate courses on urban and rural planning at the Universities of El Rosario and El Externado in Bogota. Through her roles as an active architect, civil servant, international expert, and academician, Juana has been involved in the research, planning, and building of the human habitat, and has developed a broad and unique perspective on environmental issues, and their impact on the various stakeholders.


Victoria Marshall

Victoria Marshall

ASLA, TILL DESIGN
Newark NJ USA

Victoria Marshall is the principal and founder of TILL, a Newark based design practice. She is a registered landscape architect trained in both landscape architecture and urban design. Originally from Sydney, Australia, Ms. Marshall completed her graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania PennDesign in 1997 with a Masters of Landscape Architecture and Certificate in Urban Design. In 2010 she launched and directed a new Urban Design BS Program at Parsons The New School for Design, and was awarded a 2010-2012 fellowship by the India China Institute. In addition to participation in the academy, Ms. Marshall is engaged in collaborative research with ecologists which is reflected in numerous publications. The goal of switching between these three modes; making, teaching and collaborating is to allow broader fields of inquiry into TILL and to also allow multiple ways of working to emerge out of TILL. This is not just for personal curiosity, it is a strategic choice toward building a better design practice as well as a way to hold open the question of how to live in cities.


Jimena Martignoni

Jimena Martignoni

Jimena Martignoni is an Argentinean architect with degrees in landscape, city and environmental planning.
As a freelance writer and curator she specializes in urban and landscape architecture projects in Latin America. She is the author of: Latinscapes, landscape as raw material, (Gustavo Gili Publishers, Spain, 2008); the monographs Mario Schjetnan: Urban Environment and Landscape (Arquine, Mexico, 2012) and Teresa Moller: Unveiling Landscape (Puro Chile Publishers, Chile, February 2014); Broader Perspectives: Latin American landscapes, (Dalian University, China, April 2014). She has been a regular contributor to Landscape Architecture Magazine (USA), Landscape Design China (China), Topos (Germany), Arquine (Mexico), Landscape Magazine (United Arab Emirates), and has also written for Architectural Record (USA), Green Source Magazine (USA), Green Places (UK) and in Argentina for La Nación newspaper and Barzon Magazine, Plot Magazine and 30-60 Cuadernos de Arquitectura.
She visits every project she covers and works with professional photographers in Buenos Aires, São Paulo, Santiago, Bogotá, Medellín, Belém, Montevideo and Caracas.
—She has been invited by the SCA and by different universities (UBA, UP, UB, Universidad de La Plata, UNAM en Ciudad de México, Universidad de Cordoba, Universidad Los Andes) to lecture on architecture and is a professor at the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella (Buenos Aires), for the Graduate Landscape Program.
—She has completed a research and documented new architectural projects and the process of change of the city of Medellin, Colombia, supported by the Government of this city and digitally published in ARQA (March 2013).
—She was invited as a Jury member for the First Latin American Biennale of Landscape Architecture (Mexico City, June 2014), by the UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) and the SAPM (Sociedad de Arq. Paisajistas de México). She was appointed President of the Jury by the rest of the Jury (from Colombia, France and México).
—In November 2012 her short story “Ciudacas” won the competition called by CPAU, “Stories of Architecture and Cities” (CPAU or Consejo Profesional de Arquitectura y Urbanismo, Argentina – “Relatos de Arquitectura y Ciudad”)
—Currently she works for the City Government of Buenos Aires, as a research and publishing consultant in the urban landscape area.


Pierre-André Martin

Pierre-André Martin

Landscape architect
Director, EMBYÁ – Paisagens & Ecossistemas
Professor of Landscape architecture & Urbanism Supervisor
Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro

Pierre-André has a Landscape architecture degree from École Nationale Supérieure de Paysage de Versailles in France and a MBA in environment from COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. He has been a leader over 13 years in urban and environment necessities in France and Brazil, taking care of the integration of urban projects with natural and the urban environment through diagnosis, guidelines and licensing. He has worked on projects in France, Canada, Italy, the United States, Ecuador, Peru and Angola and collaborated with the Brazilian landscape architect Fernando Chacel. He also participates actively in INVERDE, an independent NGO devoted to the study and defense of the environment in urban areas.


Mark McDonnell

Mark McDonnell

Director of the Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology
Melbourne, Australia

Mark has spent the past 25 years conducting ecological studies focused on understanding the structure and function of urban ecosystems, and the conservation of biodiversity in cities and towns. His research interests range widely, and include the processes driving vegetation and ecosystem change, invasion of non-indigenous plants and animals, landscape ecology, the structure and function of ecological systems in urban and suburban environments, and the conservation and restoration of urban ecosystems. He is especially recognized for his pioneering research on the study of urbanization gradients and the comparative ecology of urban ecosystems..


Brian McGrath

Brian McGrath

Professor and Architect
Parsons The New School for Design
New York, NY USA

Brian McGrath is the founder and principal of Urban-Interface, LLC, a urban design consulting practice that fuses expertise in architecture, ecology and media. The firm combines new research in urban ecosystems and digital technologies to provide urban design models that engage local participants in flexible, innovative approaches to urban densification and revitalization. Current projects included partnerships with governmental agencies, private developers and cultural institutions such as the USDA Forest Service, New Jersey Meadowlands Commission, The Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Edison Properties, Tern Landing Development, the Ironbound Community Corporation and the Skyscraper Museum. McGrath is also a principle researcher in the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a National Science Foundation’s Long Term Ecological Research, where he leads the urban design working group. His books and publications include: Digital Modeling for Urban Design and Transparent Cities, Sensing the 21st Century City (co-edited by Grahame Shane), and Cinemetrics: Architectural Drawing Today (with Jean Gardner). McGrath served as a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Thailand in 1998-99 and an India China Institute Fellow in 2006-2008. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from Syracuse University and his Masters of Architecture degree from Princeton University.


Rob McInnes

Rob McInnes

Rob McInnes is an independent Chartered Environmentalist with over 20 years experience in wetland-related research, consultancy and conservation and is Managing Director of RM Wetlands & Environment Ltd, an independent environmental consultancy dedicated to the wise use of wetlands. Rob serves on the Ramsar Convention’s Scientific and Technical Review Panel as the representative of the Society of Wetland Scientists. He is currently Task Lead on Urban Wetlands and contributes to the Panel’s work on restoration, climate change and ecosystem services. In addition to working with the Ramsar Convention, he has conducted work for UNESCO, CBD, UNDP and UN HABITAT and has undertaken projects for private companies and NGOs including IUCN and Wetlands International. Working internationally, his knowledge extends across a variety of wetland types from upland peatlands to urban ponds and he regularly publishes wetland-related articles in peer-reviewed papers, books and conference proceedings.


Timon McPhearson

Timon McPhearson

Assistant Professor
The New School
New York, NY USA

Dr. Timon McPhearson is Assistant Professor of Urban Ecology at The New School’s Tishman Environment and Design Center in New York City where he teaches urban ecology, sustainability and resilience. He earned his Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources from Rutgers University, held a postdoc at Columbia University, and worked as a biodiversity scientist at the American Museum of Natural History’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation. His research seeks to improve resilience and sustainability of urban social-ecological systems including the EU funded Urban Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (URBES) project, the MillionTreesNYC Urban Forest Restoration study, the ICLEI Urban Biosphere (URBIS) Initiative, and the UN CBD Cities and Biodiversity Outlook (CBO), a global assessment of urban biodiversity and ecosystem services.


Colin Meurk

Colin Meurk

Dr Colin Meurk is a senior ecologist at Landcare Research, a NZ government research institute specialising in characterisation, understanding and sustainable use of terrestrial resources. His special interests are biogeography, ecological restoration and design, landscape dynamics, urban ecology and conservation biology. He has been a consultant ecologist for aspects of the post-earthquake Christchurch rebuild, and has major involvements with community restoration projects in and around cities and promotes integration of biodiversity within production landscapes. He has received various awards in recognition of his applied conservation work and projects such as the Christchurch Perimeter Walkway concept. One of his recent ventures into urban integration was to gain the Supreme Award for Horticultural Excellence at the 2012 Ellerslie International Flower Show, for the exhibit ‘Transitions’ – designed and implemented for Landcare Research. This was to demonstrate indigenous opportunities for pocket parks in the city.


Mary Miss

Mary Miss

Mary Miss has reshaped the boundaries between sculpture, architecture, landscape design, and installation art by articulating a vision of the public sphere where it is possible for an artist to address the issues of our time.  She has developed the ”City as Living Lab”, a framework for making issues of sustainability tangible through collaboration and the arts. Trained as a sculptor, her work creates situations emphasizing a site’s history, its ecology, or aspects of the environment that have gone unnoticed.  Mary Miss has collaborated closely with architects, planners, engineers, ecologists, and public administrators on projects as diverse as creating a temporary memorial around the perimeter of Ground Zero, marking the predicted flood level of Boulder, Colorado, revealing the history of the Union Square Subway station in New York City or turning a sewage treatment plant into a public space. Recent projects include an installation focused on water resources in China for the Olympic Park in Beijing and a temporary installation at a seventeenth-century park in Delhi, India as part of the exhibition 49°: Public Art and Ecology.  A proposal for a permanent project at the North Carolina Museum of Art explores the presence and movement of water through the site by recovering and revitalizing elements of the watershed to reveal the wetland processes in the region.  A recipient of multiple awards, Mary Miss has been the subject of exhibitions at the Harvard University Art Museum, Brown University Gallery, The Institute of Contemporary Art in London, the Architectural Association in London, Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, and the Des Moines Art Center.  Among others, her work has been included in the exhibitions: Decoys, Complexes and Triggers at the Sculpture Center in New York, Weather Report: Art and Climate Change curated by Lucy Lippard, co-presented by the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art and EcoArts Connections, More Than Minimal: Feminism and Abstraction in the 70’s, Brandeis Museum’s Rose Art Museum, and Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis at the Tate Modern.


Franco Montalto

Franco Montalto

Dr. Montalto, PE is a licensed civil/environmental engineer and hydrologist with 20 years of experience working in urban and urbanizing ecosystems as both a designer and researcher. His experience includes planning, design, implementation, and analysis of various natural area restoration and green infrastructure projects. As an Associate Professor in Drexel University’s Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, he currently directs the Sustainable Water Resource Engineering Laboratory. He also heads up the Green Infrastructure Sector of the NOAA-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a five-year research initiative. Dr. Montalto is also the founder of eDesign Dynamics LLC, a consulting firm based In New York City that specializes in green infrastructure and ecological restoration.


Norbert Mueller

Norbert Mueller

Norbert Müller is vegetation ecologist and Professor in Landscape Management and Restoration Ecology at the University Applied Sciences Erfurt, Germany. He is teaching for landscape architecture students and his main fields in research and lecturing are conservation biology, urban biodiversity and sustainable design. In these fields he has a 30 years experience both in theory as well as in application. Since 2008 he is president of URBIO – the International network for Urban Biodiversity and Design –with currently over 1000 researchers and practitioners http://www.fh-erfurt.de/urbio. This network is a scientific initiative supporting the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) within the Mayor Group “Local Action”.

He has published a large number of papers – in 2010 the first book on “Urban Biodiversity and Design – implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity in towns and cities” (Wiley-Blackwell 626 p.).


Jenga Mwendo

Jenga Mwendo

Jenga Mwendo is the founder of the Backyard Gardeners Network (www.backyardgardenersnetwork.org), whose mission is to sustain and strengthen the historically self-sufficient and deeply rooted community of the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, LA. Through revitalizing the cultural tradition of vegetable gardening, we will in turn revitalize our devastated neighborhood, preserve our cultural heritage, and make our community more food secure. Since 2007, Mwendo has worked to strengthen the Lower Ninth Ward community – organizing neighbors to revitalize and create gardens, planting trees, and developing support systems to encourage and support the culture of growing in the neighborhood. She is the winner of the 2010 Cox Conserves Heroes award, is a 2010 TogetherGreen Fellow (www.togethergreen.org), a 2011-13 IATP Food And Community Fellow, and was featured in the 2014 Aetna African-American History calendar.


Omar Nagati

Omar Nagati

Omar Nagati is a practicing architect and urban planner who currently lives in Cairo. Having studied at UBC, Vancouver and UC Berkeley, Nagati adopts an interdisciplinary approach to urban history and design, and engages in a comparative analysis of the question of urban informality in developing countries. He teaches part-time Urban Design Studio at the MSA University in Giza and has recently cofounded CLUSTER, a new platform for critical urban research and design initiatives downtown Cairo. clustercairo.org


Harini Nagendra

Harini Nagendra

Professor, School of Development
Azim Premji University
Bangalore, India

Harini Nagendra is a Professor in the School of Development at Azim Premji University, and Asia Research Coordinator at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environmental Change at Indiana University. Her research straddles two major, yet linked areas examining human-driven changes in ecosystems and biodiversity in forests and cities. Harini coordinates a program of urban ecology focusing on Bangalore and Delhi in India. She is interested in seeing how people can be positive and negative agents of change, bringing about ecosystem degradation in some contexts, and providing protection and restoration in others. Harini Nagendra received a Ph.D. in Ecological Sciences in 1998 from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India. She has subsequently held positions at the University of California in San Diego, Indiana University, ETH Zurich, and ATREE Bangalore. Most recently, Harini was a Hubert H Humphrey Distinguished Visiting Professor at Macalester College in Saint Paul in 2013. She is a lead author for the IPCC Annual Report 5 – Working Group III, and a member of the Scientific Steering Committee for the International Council for Science Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society, DIVERSITAS, and the Global Land Project. She received a 2013 Elinor Ostrom Senior Scholar Award for Collective Governance of the Commons for her diversity of work, innovation and use of different methodological approaches, and her active participation as a practitioner on the urban commons.


Charlie Nilon

Charlie Nilon

Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO USA

Charlie Nilon is a professor of urban wildlife management at the University of Missouri. His research and teaching focus on urban wildlife conservation and on the human dimensions of wildlife conservation. Since 1997, he has ben a co-principal investigator on the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES). The project in Baltimore and a similar one in Phoenix are the first two urban ecosystems included in the National Science Foundation’s Long-Term Ecological Research program. His work with the BES focuses on understanding how physical, ecological and socioeconomic factors influence the abundance and composition of vertebrate species. Because urban areas are homes for people as well as wildlife, Nilon’s research also considers the role of nature as part of an individual’s day-to-day environment, and environmental justice issues associated with access to nature. Recently he has collaborated with colleagues from the MU School of Medicine on a project studying the kinds of open spaces where children are active. He’s a contributor to the upcoming City Biodiversity Outlook, an associate editor of Urban Ecosystems and a member of the URBIO advisory board.


Kate Pallett

Kate Pallett

Cape Town, South Africa
Kate Pallett has been an avid social activist and environmentalist since growing up on a farm in rural KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. Participating in HIV/AIDS youth activism in the early 2000s opened her eyes to the importance of activism and the value of civil society voice. At the University of Cape Town, Kate pursued an honours degree in Social Anthropology, linking environmental questions to human behaviour. During her studies she was an active member of the University’s Green Campus Initiative and became chairperson of the society. After completing her degree, she worked at Greenpop, a tree-planting and environmental activism organization. She currently holds a sustainability officer position at a large convention centre in Cape Town.


Matt Palmer

Matt Palmer

Senior Lecturer
Columbia University
New York, NY USA

Dr. Matt Palmer is a faculty member in the department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology at Columbia University. His research interests are in plant community ecology, with emphases on conservation, restoration and ecosystem function. Previously, Matt worked on the effects of microtopography and plant interactions on centimeter-scale diversity patterns in fens of the New Jersey Pinelands. His current research is on the community dynamics and ecosystem functions of urban forests and green roofs, the population biology of rare plants, and the effects of forest canopy disturbance on understory structure and function.


Lorenza Perelli

Lorenza Perelli

Lorenza Perelli is an art historian, writer and artist living in Chicago. She taught Public art At the University of Architecture in Milan, with the artist Emilio Fantin. She is the author of ”Public Art. Arte, interazione e progetto urbano”, edited by Franco Angeli in Milano.


Stephanie Pincetl

Stephanie Pincetl

Director
UCLA Center for Sustainable Urban Systems
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Stephanie Pincetl is Adjunct professor and Director of the U.C. campus-wide Center for Sustainable Communities at the UCLA Institute of the Environment. Pincetl conducts research on environmental policies and governance and enjoys bringing together interdisciplinary teams of researchers across the biophysical and engineering sciences with the social sciences to address problems of complex urban systems and environmental management. Pincetl has written extensively about land use in California, environmental justice, habitat conservation efforts, urban ecology, water and energy policy. You can find more about her academic work at: http://www.environment.ucla.edu/ucpe/pincetl.asp. She is an avid gardener, a devotee of the Sunday Hollywood Farmer’s Market, and loves to cook and have friends over for dinner.


Toni Pujol

Toni Pujol

Environment Officer at the Barcelona City Council.

Toni is an Environmental Scientist by the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) and holds a Master’s Degree in International Studies. He has developed his professional activity in the field of local environmental management for more than 10 years at the Barcelona City Council. He currently works within Urban Habitat Division, contributing in various strategic projects such as the 10-year Barcelona Sustainability Strategy or the Barcelona Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity Plan. He was previously project coordinator at the European Secretariat of the city network ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability in Freiburg (Germany) and holds other short term professional involvements with other international institutions such as the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the European Commission Directorate-General for Energy. He has published various articles in the fields of environmental management, local sustainability and international sustainable development.


Jose Puppim

Jose Puppim

Jose Antonio Puppim de Oliveira is Assistant Director and Senior Research Fellow at the United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS) since August 2009. He has academic interests in the political economy of sustainable development. He is particularly interested in researching patterns of environmental governance and policy implementation at different levels, looking at how global policies are translated into local policy implementation. At UNU-IAS, Jose coordinates the Sustainable Urban Futures programme and the master’s programme in Environmental Governance.

Previously, he worked at the University College London (UK), at the Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration (EBAPE) of the Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV), at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) as a European Commission’s Marie Curie Fellow, and as an instructor, consultant and researcher for several organizations such as the OECD, the World Bank Institute, state and national governments, and various NGOs and small and large firms in the private sector. His experience includes research and teaching activities in Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Uruguay, USA, Japan, Germany, Spain, Portugal, United Kingdom, Ghana and Angola. He has published seven books and a number of articles in peer-reviewed journals. He is editor of the journal Public Administration and Development (PAD, Wiley-Blackwell). Jose holds a Ph.D. in Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, USA), a Master of Environmental Science from Hokkaido University (Japan) and a degree in Engineering from the Aeronautics Technological Institute (ITA), Brazil.
Recently, he edited the book Green Economy and Good Governance for Sustainable Development (UNU Press) and the special volume in the Journal of Cleaner Production (Elsevier) on Climate Co-Benefits in Urban Asia with several research articles: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09596526/58


Toby Query

Toby Query

Toby Query has been a Natural Resources Ecologist with the City of Portland’s Watershed Revegetation Program since 1999. He manages several hundred acres of forests and wetlands in the city. Under his watch, over 3 million native seedlings and many tons of native grass and wildflower seeds have been planted. He is also the founder of Portland Ecologists Unite!, a monthly discussion group working to improve best land management practices and increase the resiliency of the community of ecologists. Toby has researched the great green macaw in Costa Rica, the spotted owl in Oregon, otters in Ireland, and is currently trying to understand why terrestrial mollusks eat his seedlings. He has a biology degree from Macalester College studying under the direction of Dr. Mark Davis. He has traveled to over 30 countries and crafts wine in his spare time.


Stephanie Radok

Stephanie Radok

Stephanie Radok is an artist, writer, freelance editor and General Editor of Artlink magazine. She spent her first year in what was then bush in east Melbourne then lived in North America and Europe before returning to Australia where she has lived in two small Australian cities Canberra and Adelaide.
In 2011 a survey exhibition of her artwork The Sublingual Museum was shown at Flinders University Art Museum. Her writing on art has been published widely in Australia. Her non-fiction book An Opening: twelve love stories about art was published in 2012 by Wakefield Press and was longlisted for the inaugural Stella Prize, a literary award for Australian women writers. Central to her work is an awareness of diverse cultures and languages; it is grounded in activism and in environmental awareness asserting the rights of animals, plants, birds and the earth.


Claire Robinson

Claire Robinson

Claire founded and serves as Managing Director of Amigos de los Rios. Her approach has led to Amigos de los Rios unique success in creating beautifully designed, culturally relevant green infrastructure in open spaces. As Managing Director, Claire is known for her collaboration skills and understanding of the multi-layered complexities of doing conservation work in Los Angeles County. Claire holds a Master’s Degree in European Studies and Urbanism from the University of East London, an architectural degree from Cooper Union in New York, and MBA from UCLA.
Claire has successfully founded two community based sustainable design groups and held a management role in several others. Her work with the nonprofit ArchiXXeme in Paris, preserving the landscape of the Menilmontant District with its underground network of creeks and streams resulted in a new parcel plan being ratified by the City of Paris that acknowledged and protected the urban fabric of the area.
Claire taught at Rhode Island School of Design, Harvard GSD, Carleton University in Canada, and served as visiting faculty at USC, Versailles and other schools across the US and in France. When executive director of North East Trees, she completed the Arroyo Seco Restoration Feasibility Study with the project partners the Arroyo Seco Foundation. Experienced in community participation processes, Claire has served as leader and facilitator of the Emerald Necklace Coalition and its subcommittees: the Safety and Security Task Force, Environmental Education and Youth Training, Funding and Advocacy.


Mary Rowe

Mary Rowe

Vice President & Managing Director
Municipal Arts Society of New York
New York, NY USA

Mary W. Rowe is currently Vice President & Managing Director of the Municipal Art Society of New York City (www.mas.org), a century-old advocacy organization working to promote the livability and resilience of New York City. She recently returned to the northeast United States after several years working in the philanthropy, most recently coordinating the New Orleans Institute for Resilience and Innovation, a loose alliance of initiatives that emerged in response to the systemic collapses of 2005. Previous positions include: a fellowship and subsequent staff position as Vice President, Urban Programs with the blue moon fund of Charlottesville, Virginia, to focus on self-organization in cities as the underpinning of urban and regional social, economic and environmental resilience; President of Ideas that Matter, a convening and publishing program based on the work of Jane Jacobs based in Toronto. She is a contributor to several volumes on urban life, with a particular interest in self-organization.


Andrew Rudd

Andrew Rudd

Urban Environment and Planning Branch
UN-HABITAT
New York City

Andrew Rudd is the Urban Environment Officer in the Urban Planning and Design Branch of UN-Habitat. He serves as focal point for the agency’s green economy, cities and biodiversity and urban agriculture initiatives, and has represented UN-Habitat in the Environmental Management Group’s IMG on the Green Economy, the International Resource Panel’s Cities Working Group, the Global Partnership on Cities and Biodiversity and the Task Forces for the City Biodiversity Index and Outlook. Mr Rudd managed the Urban Patterns for a Green Economy quick guides series, which will be launched at Rio+20. At UN-Habitat he also coordinated a photographic investigation of rapidly-growing cities and the agency’s participation in the Shanghai World Expo 2010. Previously Mr Rudd worked as an architect in New York on projects related to transport master planning and retail concept design. He is a contributing author of the upcoming City Biodiversity Outlook (2012), Working towards a Balanced and Inclusive Green Economy (2011), UN-Habitat’s State of the World’s Cities Report 2010: Bridging the Urban Divide and the LSE Cities Programme’s Housing and the City (2007). Mr Rudd received a BA in Architecture from Yale University and an MSc in City Design and Social Science from LSE.


Candice Russell

Candice Russell

Candice Russell is the Senior Manager of Environmental Education and the California Regional Environmental Education Community (CREEC) Regional Manager for Los Angeles County at TreePeople. Candice has more than 10 years of experience in environmental education. Prior positions include TreePeople’s Youth Leadership Manager, Secondary Education Program Coordinator for TreePeople’s Generation Earth program, and the Youth Program Coordinator for Earth Resource Foundation in Costa Mesa, Calif., where she also served on the CREEC Orange County Regional Advisory Committee. She chairs the 192 member CREEC-LA Environmental Education Leadership Board, the Los Angeles Watershed Education Collaborative, is a member of the Los Angeles Area Women’s Environmental Coalition, and serves on the Los Angeles Environmental Education Fair steering committee. Candice majored in Environmental Studies at San Francisco State University, with emphases in Environmental Sustainability and Social Justice.


Bob Sallinger

Bob Sallinger

Conservation Director
Audubon Society of Portland
Portland, OR USA

Bob Sallinger has worked for Audubon Society of Portland since 1992 and currently serves as the Society’s conservation director. His responsibilities include developing Audubon’s local regional and national conservation priorities and also directing Audubon’s wildlife rehabilitation hospital. In addition to his work at Audubon, Bob also serves as on the Portland Parks Board, as an elected director East Multnomah County Soil and Water Conservation District and as an adjunct law professor at Lewis and Clark Law School. Bob’s passion for conservation was developed early exploring the woods of Massachusetts and later on solo hikes from Mexico to Canada on the Pacific Crest Trail and from Canada to New Mexico on the Continental Divide. Bob has a B.A. in Biology from Reed College and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark Law School. He lives in Northeast Portland with his wife Elisabeth Neely, two children, a dog, cat, goats and chickens.


Kaveh Samiei

Kaveh Samiei

Architect and Landscape designer at AAG
Faculty member, University of Semnan
Tehran, Iran

Kaveh Samiei is founder, principal architect and landscape designer at AAG in Tehran, and faculty member in school of architecture and urban planning at the University of Semnan, where he teaches ecological architecture; fundamentals of ecology; contemporary styles of architecture; and Persian and Japanese gardening. Kaveh’s current interests include theoretical, methodological and practical approaches to sustainable- ecological architecture and urban design in context of modern urban areas with emphasis on urban ecology, vertical greenery (green roofs, facades) and design of wildlife habitats. In fact, he works and researches on the frontier between architecture and landscape architecture. As a registered architect in Iran, he is also an expert in designing ecological high-rise residential complexes. Kaveh received a BA in Architecture and MArch in Architecture and Landscape design (Dual degree) with distinction from Tarbiat Modares University at Tehran. His comprehensive website, “ArchiNature”, about ideas, theories and experiences of combining architecture and cities with nature is currently under construction.


Eric Sanderson

Eric Sanderson

Senior Conservation Ecologist
Wildlife Conservation Society
Bronx NY USA

Eric W. Sanderson is a Senior Conservation Ecologist at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and the author of Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City (Abrams, 2009). Currently he is working on a book about the prospect for an American landscape beyond oil, cars and suburbs, while pursuing the Welikia Project (welikia.org), on the historical ecology of the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island, and Mannahatta 2409 (mannahatta2409.org), an on-line forum to help the public envision climate-resilient designs for Manhattan. He is an expert in species and landscape conservation planning, including in cities, with a particular interest in geographic and historic contexts for restoration and conservation. Previously he helped create the human footprint map of anthropogenic impact globally, the landscape species approach to conservation, and range-wide priority-setting for wide-ranging wildlife species. Sanderson holds a Ph.D. in ecology, with emphasis in ecosystem and landscape ecology, from the University of California, Davis. He works out of WCS headquarters at the Bronx Zoo (wcs.org).


Richard Scott

Richard Scott

Richard Scott
Senior Project Manager, Landlife

Richard first worked as ecologist at Macclesfield Borough Council in the late 1980’s, and then for the very first Groundwork Trust in St.Helens and Knowsley, establishing experimental trials to discover the best way to bring wildflowers into standard urban amenity landscapes. His interests are focused on applying urban ecology and habitat creation techniques in challenging environments and areas of social deprivation.

In 1990 Richard won a National Trust Arkell Travel fellowship, to study the use of wildflowers in the United States, and visited the still fairly new National Wildflower Research Centre in Austin Texas, this provided the inspiration to the concept of such a Centre in the UK, which won Millennium Commission funding and was opened to the public in April 2001. The National Wildflower Centre based at Court Hey Park, in Knowsley Borough Council, on the edge of Liverpool is now well established as a place to inspire individuals and landscape professionals alike.

Richard has worked for Landlife since 1991, developing creative conservation philosophy, practical demonstrations, and managing wildflower seed production. His experience is encapsulated in Landlife’s publications: Wildflowers Work (2004) and Soil Inversion (2008). Over the past five years he has created 350 hectares of new habitat across the UK involving national partners and local communities. His work has received UNESCO awards (2004 & 2008) and been selected by the European Commission Directorate General DG REGIO (2005) as an example of best practice.

Richard co-authored the English Nature Publication. Flowers in the Grass (1992) and the CABE Space Guidelines Making Contracts work for wildlife: how to encourage biodiversity in urban parks (2004). He is a founder member of Plantlife, and Treasurer of the Urban Wildlife Network a member of the international Society for Ecological Restoration (SER), winning the Society’s Communication Award in 2005. And, in 2006, readers of English Nature’s Urbio magazine nominated him as one of the key promoters of new audiences in the urban nature movement. In 2011 he was chosen as a Campaign Hero by the Ecologist Magazine. In April this year Richard signed a memorandum of Understanding to help develop a new Chinese wildflower seed initiatives in Cities like Chengdu and Kunming, which are among the worlds fasted growing Cities.


Karen Seto

Karen Seto

Karen Seto is Professor of Geography and Urbanization at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Her research focuses on urban land use change, forecasting urban growth, and environmental consequences of urban expansion. She has pioneered methods using satellite remote sensing to reconstruct historical patterns of urbanization and to develop projections of future urban expansion. She specializes in China and India, where she has conducted urbanization research for more than fifteen years. Professor Seto serves on a number of international and national scientific advisory committees: she is a Coordinating Lead Author of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, chapter on Human Settlements, Infrastructure and Spatial Planning, and Co-Chair of the Future Earth Project on Urbanization and Global Environmental Change. She was named an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in 2009.


Soul Shava

Soul Shava

Dr Soul Shava is an environment and sustainability education specialist. He holds a PhD in Environmental Education from Rhodes University, South Africa. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Environmental Education in the Department of Science and Technology Education at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Dr Shava has research interests in Indigenous Knowledges, particularly their representation in knowledge generation processes at the interface of modern institutions and local communities and their application in community development contexts and environmental education processes in southern Africa; community based natural resources management (CBNRM), socio-ecological resilience; climate change; green economy; intangible cultural heritage; sustainable agriculture, traditional agribiodiversity conservation; and the use of traditional crops and indigenous food plants by local communities to achieve food security and resilience to climate change impacts.


Bill Sherwonit

Bill Sherwonit

Nature Writer
Anchorage, AK USA

Born in Bridgeport, Conn., nature writer Bill Sherwonit has called Alaska home since 1982. He has contributed essays and articles to a wide variety of publications and is also the author of 13 books. His most recent books include Living with Wildness: An Alaskan Odyssey and Changing Paths: Travels and Meditations in Alaska’s Arctic Wilderness. Most of Sherwonit’s work focuses on Alaskan subjects, with an emphasis on wilderness adventure, wildlands preservation, environmental issues, natural history, wildlife management, relationship with place, and notions of wildness, including the wildness to be found in and around his adopted home, Anchorage. Sherwonit also teaches nature writing.


Philip Silva

Philip Silva

TreeKit, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY USA

Philip Silva is a Ph.D. student in Natural Resources at Cornell University. His work focuses on informal adult learning and participatory action research in social-ecological systems. For the past four years, Silva taught courses in urban forestry, environmental history, and design at The New School. In 2011, Silva was one of 25 national leaders convened by the US Forest Service to participate in the “Vibrant Cities and Urban Forests” task force. He has worked with some of NYC’s leading environmental organizations, including Sustainable South Bronx, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Just Food, and the Southern Bronx River Watershed Alliance. Philip is a recipient of the 2010 iLAB Residency of the Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art, Nature, and Dance (“iLAND”) and a 2009 Fellow of the Environmental Leadership Program. He currently serves as co-founder and co-director of TreeKIT, an initiative to measure, map, and collaboratively manage urban forests. A native of Newark, NJ with a graduate degree in urban policy analysis, Silva is dedicated to exploring nature in all of its urban expressions.


Glenn Stewart

Glenn Stewart

Professor of Urban Ecology
Lincoln University
Christchurch, New Zealand

Glenn Stewart is Professor of Urban Ecology, Lincoln University, NZ. He graduated in NZ before completing his PhD at Oregon State University, USA. He has published over 200 refereed journal articles, conference proceedings, books, book chapters and presented his research at over 100 international and national conferences and workshops. After twenty years as a forest ecologist Glenn turned his attention to urban forestry and urban biodiversity. He now conducts research on the compositional variation in urban plant communities and how these communities can be enhanced by design using indigenous species. Current research is on Southern Hemisphere urban ecosystems and current issues with invasive species, successional processes and predicted changes in global climate. He is Associate Editor for Landscape & Urban Planning (urban eology and design) Associate Editor for Plant Ecology, on the editorial Board of Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, President of Southern Connection, Deputy Director of the Isaac Centre for Nature Conservation, and a member of the URBIO Advisory Board.


Erika Svendsen

Erika Svendsen

Research Social Scientist
U.S. Forest Service
New York, NY USA

Dr. Erika Svendsen is a social scientist with the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station and is based in New York City. Erika studies environmental stewardship and issues related to hybrid governance, collective resilience and human well-being. She is particularly interested in understanding the spatial, temporal and sacred aspects of stewardship systems. Erika is part of the NYC Urban Field Station, a unique research collaboration founded by the Forest Service and NYC Parks. The Urban Field Station is both a physical place to conduct research and a network of scientists and practitioners dedicated to improving the quality of life in urban areas by conducting and supporting research about social-ecological systems and natural resource management.


Maria Tengö

Maria Tengö

Maria Tengö is a researcher at the Stockholm Resilience Centre in Sweden and co-leader of the research theme Stewardship in Social-Ecological Systems. She is particularly interested in how different manifestations of strong human-nature relationships can contribute to build social-ecological resilience, and is engaged in research on traditional and local knowledge, cultural ecosystem services, and the emergence and spread of ecosystem stewardship. In our urban life-styles, how may we re-connect with nature as well as follow development paths that build on rather than disrupts positive connections between people and nature? Her work has mainly been focused on Southern Africa, but she has also worked in India, and is engaged in science-policy processes that link local insights and experiences to global level policy making, for example within the CBD and the IPBES.


Lisa Terreni

Lisa Terreni

Lisa Terreni is a senior lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington’s Faculty of Education, teaching in the early childhood education degree programmes. She has been involved in early childhood education for many years – as a kindergarten teacher, a senior teacher, and as a professional development adviser for the Ministry of Education. She is also an artist.
Lisa’s current research interests focus on exploring how visual art can be used to enhance young children’s thinking, communication and literacy skills, and the impact ICT can have on young children’s visual art learning experiences. She is currently undertaking data gathering for her PhD entitled “I know what that is! It’s modern art!” Early childhood access to and use of art museums in Aotearoa New Zealand. This research aims to determine the current extent of art museum visiting by the early childhood sector in New Zealand, and investigate both facilitators and barriers to access.


Keith Tidball

Keith Tidball

Senior Extension Associate
Department of Natural Resources
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY USA

Dr. Keith Tidball is a Senior Extension Associate in the Department of Natural Resources where he serves as Associate Director of the Civic Ecology Lab (civicecology.org/) and Program Leader for both the Nature & Human Security Program and the Communities and Urban Forests Extension Program. He is also the New York State Coordinator for NY EDEN (emergencypreparedness.cce.cornell.edu). Tidball’s research is focused on the interactions between humans and nature in the context of disasters and war. He is particularly interested in how these interactions relate to social-ecological system resilience, or in other words, how humans and their interactions with nature are related to a system`s ability to bounce back after being disturbed.


Ted Trzyna

Ted Trzyna

Ted Trzyna cofounded and chairs IUCN’s Urban Specialist Group. He is president of InterEnvironment Institute, an affiliate of Claremont Graduate University in California. A political scientist and former State Department Foreign Service officer, he has worked in nature conservation internationally since the early 1970s.


Naomi Tsur

Naomi Tsur

Founder and President of Green Pilgrim Jerusalem
Global Ambassador of the Green Pilgrimage Network

Naomi Tsur has recently completed a five-year stint as Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel with the portfolios of strategic planning and sustainable development.
As Deputy Mayor she led Jerusalem’s recycling revolution, and integrated urban nature into city planning in major projects such as the Gazelle Valley Urban Nature Park and the Railway Park. In the recent municipal elections she initiated and headed a cross-sectoral women-led party, with a non-political agenda of sustainable development for Jerusalem. Before serving as Deputy Mayor, she founded and headed the non-governmental Sustainable Jerusalem Coalition. While in office in the municipality, she initiated the Green Pilgrimage Network, launched in 2011. The goal of the GPN is to engage Pilgrim Cities around the world, together with the faith communities that view them as important spiritual destinations, in achieving mutual respect and in aiming to ”leave a more positive footprint”.


Gavin Van Horn

Gavin Van Horn

Gavin Van Horn is the Director of Cultures of Conservation for the Center for Humans and Nature, a nonprofit organization that focuses on and promotes conservation ethics. Gavin leads interdisciplinary projects for the Center that examine place-based values and human relationships to the more-than-human world. He is co-editor (with Dave Aftandilian) of City Creatures: Animal Encounters in the Chicago Wilderness, to be released by the University of Chicago Press in 2015, and is currently working on a co-edited volume (with John Hausdoerffer) entitled Relative Wild: Common Grounds for Conservation. He writes for, edits, and curates the City Creatures blog.


Shawn Van Sluys

Shawn Van Sluys

Shawn Van Sluys is the Executive Director of Musagetes, a philanthropic foundation that experiments in small Canadian and European cities with ways to connect communities more deeply with the arts and creativity. The foundation’s mandate is to make the arts more central and meaningful in people’s lives, in their communities and societies. He joined Musagetes as its first Executive Director in January 2009. Prior to that, he was the first Executive Director of the Canadian Art Museum Directors’ Organization, a national arts-service organization that represents 85 museum directors. Shawn studied art history at the University of Lethbridge. He is the Vice-President of the Guelph Jazz Festival and of the Ammirato Culture House in Lecce, Italy. As a member of the Executive Team of the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) at the University of Guelph, he leads the Practice-Based Research working group.


Shubhalaxmi Vaylure

Shubhalaxmi Vaylure

V.Shubhalaxmi has experience of two decades in the field of environment education and entomology and four years in non-profit management. She heads the education department of BNHS which includes two Conservation Education Centres in Mumbai and New Delhi. She holds a doctoral in Entomology from University of Mumbai and attended Boston University during her Hubert Humphrey Fellowship programme in 2009 and University of Montana during Fulbright Fellowship in 2003. Her skill set lies on development of educational materials, conducting training workshops and developing online environmental courses. She has been a pioneer in starting first online environmental courses in India. She has adapted several of educational modules of United States at the centres she manage. She has developed range of educational materials for teachers and general public. Besides her professional experience she is the first female entomologist in India to study moths. She is currently writing book on Indian Moths.


Paula Villagra

Paula Villagra

Institute of Environmental Science and Evolution
Science Faculty, Universidad Austral de Chile

Paula Villagra is a Landscape Architect with a PhD on Landscape Perception. She was the Chilean Delegate (2006-2013) and the Chair of the Communication Committee (2010-2013) of the International Federation of Landscape Architects. Paula has been actively involved in the planning and design of urban parks, plazas and botanical gardens. Nowadays, she is focused on teaching and research. As a founder and coordinator of the PRU-Lab (http://pru-lab.cl/) she is interested to understand the transactions between people and the landscape in human environments affected by natural disturbances, to inform the design and planning of cities. She has studied people’s perception of the visual effects of prescribed burns in South East Australia, and the effect of volcanic eruptions in the touristic landscape of the south of Chile. Her current research interest is about the role, characteristics and measures of the urban landscape and urban form that influence the adaptive capacity of cities affected by earthquakes.


Marten Wallberg

Mårten Wallberg

Mårten Wallberg is President of Swedish Society for Nature Conservation the Stockholm Branch and also vice president of the national section of Swedish Society for Nature Conservation. He is a biologist with additional studies in Economy, 50 years old and lives with his wife and daughter in the center of Stockholm.


Peter Werner

Peter Werner

Peter Werner studied biology at the Free University of Berlin from 1973 to 1980 and he started his scientific career with a research project about the ecological importance of industrial wastelands in the city of Berlin. Since 1983, he is senior researcher at the Institute for Housing and Environment in Darmstadt, Germany, project manager and co-worker in projects concerning sustainable urban development, specialising in environmental problems and biological diversity in urban areas. Beyond that, he is co-author of national programmes and guidelines concerning ecological urban development and nature conservation in urban areas, and m Member of various national and international expert groups, e.g., “National Platform on Future Cities” or “City Biodiversity Index”. Peter Werner is also managing the German Competence Network on Urban Ecology CONTUREC and publishing a journal with the same name.


Mike Wetter

Mike Wetter

Mike Wetter is a founder and Executive Director of The Intertwine Alliance, where he leads a coalition of more than 100 of the most prominent public, private and nonprofit organizations working on parks, trails and natural areas in the Portland-Vancouver area. Mike’s work is to create a movement powerful enough to change investment paradigms so that nature is integrated more deeply into the fabric of the metropolitan region, creating economic, transportation, health, educational and environmental benefits for the region and its residents. Mike previously was chief of Staff to Metro Council President David Bragdon, and spent 13 years as a management consultant creating and managing organization development and business strategies.


Steve Whitney

Steve Whitney

Steve Whitney is a program officer with the Seattle-based Bullitt Foundation. He is engaged on issues of urban planning and sustainability, specifically the protection of natural capital and associated ecosystem services in the major metropolitan regions of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Previously he spent fourteen years on the staff of The Wilderness Society, first as director of its National Parks Program in Washington D.C., and later as Northwest Regional Director and Deputy Vice President. His early career included work as a land-use planning consultant, and as a congressional aide to then Representative Leon Panetta of California. He has served on numerous non-profit boards, and on the City of Alexandria, Virginia’s Environmental Policy Commission. Steve holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Utah State University’s College of Natural Resources, and a Master’s degree in Architecture and Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles.


Diana Wiesner

Diana Wiesner

Diana Wiesner is a landscape architect, proprietor of the firm Architecture and Landscape (www.dianawiesner.com) and director of the non-profit foundation Cerros de Bogotá (www.cerrosdebogota.org). Diana has 20 years of experience in themes of urban ecology, design of public space and research and analysis of ecological and urban issues. She seeks to integrate culturally based place making, and community participation to advance the health and well-being of humans and ecosystems at the local, regional, and global scales. She been distinguished with various awards: Jinzhou, China at the World Landscape Art Exposition in 2013; Acknowledgment prize 2008 for Sustainable Construction; seven first place prizes at the Colombian Architecture Competitions 2004 to 2009, two first place prizes at the Colombian Architecture Biennials 2006 and 2008; three first place prizes at the International Architecture Biennials in 1991, 2002 and 2006. Project selected in the Latin American Landscape Bienal and Rosa Barba International Landscape prize 2014.


Lynn Wilson

Lynn Wilson

Park Planner
Parks and Environmental Services
Capital Regional District
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Lynn Wilson (MCIP, RPP) is a regional park planner for a 33,000-acre natural area system on Southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. The regional park system provides strong linkages between the nature found in a growing urban area (anchored by Victoria–the provincial capital), and the remote and wild portions of the Capital Regional District (CRD). Lynn has a strong interest in mediating between the two, and as such, is working with the CRD on implementing the concept of “Nature Needs Half” which seeks to preserve half of the region’s lands and waters for nature in a connected matrix stretching from the urban core to the wilderness fringes. Lynn has an M.A. in Parks and Recreation Administration, an M.A. in Community and Regional Planning, and is completing an M.A. in Public Administration. Lynn is a registered professional planner, and serves on the Board of Directors of the George Wright Society and the Institute of Public Administration Canada (Victoria Chapter). She is a member of several IUCN commissions related to protected areas and ecosystem resilience, and serves on the Canadian Institute of Planners International Affairs Advisory Committee.


Kathleen Wolf

Kathleen Wolf

Dr. Kathleen Wolf is a Research Social Scientist at the College of the Environment, University of Washington, and a key collaborator with the US Forest Service Pacific NW Research Station on urban forestry studies. She consults as a research advisor with the the TKF Foundation’s NatureSacred program. Dr. Wolf’s research explores the human dimensions of urban ecosystems. She has also worked professionally as a landscape architect and as an environmental planner. Kathy’s professional mission is to discover, understand and communicate human behavior and benefits, as people experience nature in cities and towns. Moreover, Kathy is interested in how scientific information can be integrated into local government policy and planning. She has served with national organizations that promote nature in cities, such as the Transportation Research Board national committee on Landscape and Environment, and the Sustainable Sites Initiative. For more information see: www.naturewithin.info; and the Green Cities: Good Health project: www.greenhealth.washington.edu


Darlene Wolnik

Darlene Wolnik

Wolnik has been a community organizer since the 1980s ​, working ​​on pocketbook and environmental issues and direct action across the U.S. Since 2001, Wolnik has worked on building community food systems-specifically farmers markets-by creating resources and offering training across North America. Her website www.helpingpublicmarketsgrow.com includes some of her reports and analysis of food systems and she writes about New Orleans on her www.frenchquarterbxb.com blog.


Mary Wyatt

Mary Wyatt

Mary Wyatt, Executive Director of the TKF Foundation, is an integral piece in the envisioning, planning, launch, and ongoing leadership of TKF. She is TKF’s unmistakable Firesoul. Mary has been a member of Washington Regional Area Grantmakers (WRAG) and served as Association for Baltimore Area Grantmakers’ Chair of the Green Funders Affinity Group for more than 10 years. She is a certified Master Gardener and volunteers in open, sacred places in her own city. Mary worked closely with grantees from every size of organization in the creation of more than 130 regional open spaces, sacred places. She is grateful for the opportunities to work with such a diverse and dedicated group of individuals, driven by a determination to make their own communities better for everyone. For Mary, partnering in the creation of urban greenspace has really been about growing hope and resilience.


Xie Pengfei

Pengfei Xie

Director, Sustainable Cities Project
Natural Resources Defense Council
Beijing, China

Pengfei XIE is now the director of China Sustainable Cities Project in NRDC China Program. Prior to joining NRDC, Dr. XIE worked as a senior research fellow and a principal investigator with the China Society for Urban Studies, Ministry of Housing and Urban‐Rural Development (MOHURD). He is an associate professor and an expert on sustainable urban planning and development with MOHURD. Dr. XIE has experience in both research and project management. He has led research teams to compile the national guidelines and standards for urban sustainability, like the Low Carbon Ecocity Development Guideline, the China Habitat Environment Evaluation Index System, and the China Ecocity Indicator System and Best Practices. Dr. XIE has worked as a research fellow with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. He did his PhD in Peking University (China) and his Msc in the University College London (UK).


Na Xiu

Na Xiu

Na Xiu, landscape architect and PhD student in Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Interested in how green and blue spaces in cities can be strongly connected, landscape history and theory in Scandinavia and China.


Lorena Zárate

Lorena Zárate

Lorena Zárate is currently President of Habitat International Coalition (HIC). She was regional coordinator of HIC-Latin America office (2003 to 2011). She has been involved in the elaboration and dissemination of the World Charter on the Right to the City, the consultation process to define the Mexico City Human Rights Program, and the Promoting Committee for the elaboration of the Mexico City Charter for the Right to the City. At international level, she has been in close collaboration with the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Adequate Housing and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. She has published books and articles on issues related to housing rights, social production and management of habitat and the right to the city. She has participated as speaker in more than 20 countries. In 2013, she was awarded with the John Bousfield Distinguished Visitorship from the Geography and Urban Planning Program at the University of Toronto.

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