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Tim Beatley,  Charlottesville

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Tim Beatley

Tim Beatley

Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities
University of Virginia School of Architecture
Charlottesville, VA USA

Tim Beatley is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities, in the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, at the University of Virginia, where he has taught for the last twenty-five years. Much of Beatley’s work focuses on creative strategies by which cities and towns can fundamentally reduce their ecological footprints, while at the same time becoming more livable and equitable places. He is the author or co-author of more than fifteen books, including Green Urbanism, Native to Nowhere, Ethical Land Use, and his most recent book, Biophilic Cities. He holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

December 14, 2014
PresJohnsonSigns WildernessAct

September 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the signing into United States law of the Wilderness Act. A watershed act and a cornerstone of contemporary environmentalism, it  put into place new and important safeguards on the protection and development of some of the nation’s most impressive wild areas. As we celebrate the accomplishments of this … Continue reading Celebrating the Wilderness Act of 1964—and Celebrating Wildness in Cities

August 2, 2014
The Nature Pyramid

(This encore publication originally appeared at TNOC on 7 August 2012.) I have long been a believer in E.O. Wilson’s idea of biophilia; that we are hard-wired from evolution to need and want contact with nature. To have a healthy life, emotionally and physically, requires this contact. The empirical evidence of this is overwhelming: exposure to nature lowers our blood … Continue reading TNOC Encore: Exploring the Nature Pyramid

June 11, 2014
Sea images A2

While we are increasingly a planet of cities, we must not forget that we live and share space on the blue planet. We rarely put these two realms (or words) together, but we must begin to. By some estimates, two-thirds of our global population lies within 400 kilometers of a shoreline. As oceanographer and National … Continue reading Blue Urbanism: Connecting Cities and the Nature of Oceans

December 4, 2013
biophilic cities postcards_Page_1

Nature provides immense emotional, spiritual and health benefits to residents of cities. There is little wonder then as to why many of us in the urban planning and design fields see nature as central and essential to all that we do and to imagining the future of cities. The concept of biophilia is at the … Continue reading Launching the Global Biophilic Cities Network

June 5, 2013
Photo: Tim Beatly

What we choose to name and the names we choose to remember, for the places, people and things around us, says a great deal about what is important to us. It is commonly said, and accurately so I believe, that we will not care about what we do not recognize. That we increasingly lack the … Continue reading Naming and Claiming in Cities of Nature—Why We Should Worry About Our Inability to Recognize Common Species

January 13, 2013
SoundFeature

In recent presentations about green cities and green urbanism I often play for audiences several common natural sounds, to see whether they recognize what they are hearing.  Here is one of the sounds I often play—something commonly heard in communities in the eastern US. Click here for a mystery nature sound.  Do you recognize this? … Continue reading Celebrating the Natural Soundscapes of Cities

August 7, 2012
DucksCentralPark3

I have long been a believer in E.O. Wilson’s idea of biophilia; that we are hard-wired from evolution to need and want contact with nature. To have a healthy life, emotionally and physically, requires this contact. The empirical evidence of this is overwhelming: exposure to nature lowers our blood pressure, lowers stress and alters mood … Continue reading Exploring the Nature Pyramid